Roses forum→Looking for recommendations

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Name: Diego S
Norway
dsaldivar
Apr 3, 2020 2:43 PM CST
Hello everyone!

I have recently moved to Norway (the southernmost tip) and I am finding it difficult to find super posh pastries and tea shops like the ones I frequented in Paris and Mexico City. So, I have decided I will bake my own brioche and my own rose macarons.

In order to make those last ones, I need edible roses. Since I am going to be doing the baking myself, might as well cultivate the roses too.
Now, I've been doing some research and I am quite frankly overwhelmed by all the options, varieties, caveats and opinions.
So, I'm here to ask for your expert help.

I need a variety of rose that:
- Is sturdy and low-maintenance (I'll have to cultivate the rose in my apt's balcony)
- Thrives in cool weather (South of Norway).
- Has strong fragrance/flavor.
- Blooms repeatedly or continuously.

The size of the blooms is irrelevant. I prefer pinkish colours, but it is not a deal breaker.
I'll be happy to get your thoughts and opinions on the subject.

Thanks!
[Last edited by dsaldivar - Apr 4, 2020 2:24 AM (+)]
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Apr 3, 2020 3:08 PM CST
Welcome to the rose forum, Diego! I have no experience with edible roses, but I think your project sounds very interesting. Someone will certainly be along shortly with advice/ideas.
Porkpal
Name: Christopher
New Brunswick, NJ, USA (Zone 7a)
Image
AquaEyes
Apr 3, 2020 6:42 PM CST
I'd suggest 'Stanwell Perpetual'. It can get big, but won't die from a yearly haircut. You may have to do some protection for it in the coldest part of Winter if it lives in a pot.

https://www.helpmefind.com/ros...

:-)

~Christopher
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Apr 3, 2020 8:37 PM CST
If you do use any rose petals for baking/food, please make sure that they don't have an insecticide sprayed on them. Other than that, all rose blossoms are edible. Smiling
Name: Diego S
Norway
dsaldivar
Apr 4, 2020 2:03 AM CST
Mustbnuts said:If you do use any rose petals for baking/food, please make sure that they don't have an insecticide sprayed on them. Other than that, all rose blossoms are edible. Smiling


Which is why I want to cultivate them myself.
That way I am 100% sure of having no pesticides poisoning my tea and my pastries.
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche,Rio Negro, Argentina (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Apr 4, 2020 5:31 PM CST
Diego, in my tradition ( Armenian) rose petals are used basically to make rose petal marmelade which is a delicacy offered in special occasions. Its also as a filling to 'locum' also known as Turkish delight.
My grandmother showed me how to prepare it in my childhood. She would choose deep red roses ( that she grew specially for that) that were very fragrant i.e Crimson Glory. In my view with roses, what one does is add its fragrance to the preparation rather than its flavor. So having this in mind, there are quite a few Hybrid Tea roses that could provide it. Not all will do well in a pot. Here I grow outside: Papa Meilland, Mildred Scheel, Marcel Pagnol all which could provide that type of bloom. Other's that I've had experience with are: Mr. Lincoln, Oklakoma, Dufzauber, Canasta and Charles Mallerin. Other colours also can be very fragrant, but I have no culinary experience with them.
Could you bring inside, under shelter ( in a cool but not freezing area) part of your winter? That would widen options. Some of the red D.Austins are not so large bushes: 'William Shakespeare 2000' ; 'The Prince', 'Noble Anthony'. With Ht's I would want to know more about your winter conditions temperature wise.
Arturo
[Last edited by hampartsum - Apr 5, 2020 4:28 AM (+)]
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Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography Ferns
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Willinator
Apr 5, 2020 2:40 PM CST
You might want to consider Rugosa roses
They do well with cold weather.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Diego S
Norway
dsaldivar
Apr 6, 2020 1:54 AM CST
hampartsum said:Diego, in my tradition ( Armenian) rose petals are used basically to make rose petal marmelade which is a delicacy offered in special occasions. Its also as a filling to 'locum' also known as Turkish delight.
My grandmother showed me how to prepare it in my childhood. She would choose deep red roses ( that she grew specially for that) that were very fragrant i.e Crimson Glory. In my view with roses, what one does is add its fragrance to the preparation rather than its flavor. So having this in mind, there are quite a few Hybrid Tea roses that could provide it. Not all will do well in a pot. Here I grow outside: Papa Meilland, Mildred Scheel, Marcel Pagnol all which could provide that type of bloom. Other's that I've had experience with are: Mr. Lincoln, Oklakoma, Dufzauber, Canasta and Charles Mallerin. Other colours also can be very fragrant, but I have no culinary experience with them.
Could you bring inside, under shelter ( in a cool but not freezing area) part of your winter? That would widen options. Some of the red D.Austins are not so large bushes: 'William Shakespeare 2000' ; 'The Prince', 'Noble Anthony'. With Ht's I would want to know more about your winter conditions temperature wise.
Arturo


Thanks Arturo for your in-depth recommendations!

I just moved to Kristiansand and I didn't find the winter to be excessively frigid.
Then again, locals tell me global warming has been reducing snow days, so Wikipedia's data can be a bit obsolete on that front.

Thumb of 2020-04-06/dsaldivar/6d7028

Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche,Rio Negro, Argentina (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Apr 6, 2020 3:45 AM CST
Diego, I studied your climate chart. There are two different considerations:
1. Average winter lows. These give you an idea of how cold it gets on average. All of the roses that I mentioned would survive those temperatures IF: the pot where it is growing is well insulated during the winter months. You will have to study how to do that there.
2. Extreme winter freezes. Fortunately in those cases you can anticipate extreme winter drops via the meteoroligical forecasts. In those cases below -7ÂșC I would move the pot indoors for a few days until the extreme cold spell is over.
The lack of winter snow is really a problem. Snow is an excellent insulator. So wth less snow, the canes will be exposed to freezing damage. That is why I asked about your available place, and kind. People living in much colder areas grow roses in pots but bring them inside into a cold garage or basement ( frost free) and winterize them there. In other words, beyond the choice of roses, your available accomodations is also part of your decision making process.
Arturo
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography Ferns
Image
Willinator
Apr 9, 2020 8:36 AM CST
Hello Again,

The reason I recommended Rugosa roses is that they
produce good hips and can be found in shades of pink
which allows for good edible roses. Also, in your situation
I would say they should work great because they are grown
in colder climates and do well near the coast.

I do not grow these roses here in Houston, TX zone 9a
because they like some time to "rest" and here we
just do not give roses any time to rest. I have other
varieties that I have grown which bloom nearly all year
long especially if we have a warm winter season.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
Image
Mustbnuts
Apr 17, 2020 8:31 PM CST
Greenmantle has a whole article (very long article) on the history of roses, making oil/perfume and using roses in cooking. http://www.greenmantlenursery....

"The chief culinary use of rose Blooms has always been Conserve of Roses, a jam of preserved petals luscious in color and delicious in taste. While fragrant red rose petals (an essential) have a fairly astringent and acidic flavor, lots of honey - or sugar - gives this confection a sweet spin. One rose was central to the manufactury of the confection: Rosa gallica, in a form of the species with additional size and extra petals that had been cultivated in the Eastern Mediterranean for milennia."

"The rose petals were picked early - when the dew of dawn had begun to dry - and at the moment blooms were just reaching the point of fully open. Once the bitter white "claws" at the base of the petals were trimmed off...... the petals were rinsed thoroughly and checked for floating insect life. Placed in a non-reactive vessel and covered with fresh water, blooms were stewed until their color infused the water. The addition of a great amount of sweetening, whether honey or sugar - and the simmering & skimming & stirring of the mixture with a wooden spoon until thick - resulted in a delightfully tinted and tasty preserve of roses petals. Modern versions of this conserve can be found in such books as Rose Recipes from Olden Times by Eleanor Sinclair Rohde (1883-1950) and the 2 vol. encyclopedic A Modern Herbal by Maude Grieve (1858-1941). Both works are excellent sources for how to use (ORGANIC) Roses in your kitchen.

Perhaps one of the simplest things to do with petals is make a cup of Tea - mixed with a favorite Green or Oolong type.... also along with a mint or lemon balm or chamomile tisane. A Rose Vinegar can be created by steeping a good quality cider or white wine vinegar with deep red petals until some of the color and fragrance has been infused. Rosewater or homemade Tincture of Roses can be used to dilute the strong acidity of pomegranate or cranberry juices if desired... For all of these uses, most of the varieties recommended above for Potpourri etc. are appropriate - the classic types of Gallicas and Damasks are the traditional favorites, and the repeat-blooming Portlands and Rugosas are exceptional, providing masses of scented blooms throughout the season."

He then goes into various types of roses whose hips are used in cooking, etc. It is towards the end of this long article, but it should help you get the types of roses that you want for this and then see how they will react to your new climate.

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