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Apr 7, 2020 7:07 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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Ok, think I goofed up. I have two Spanish lavender that are three years old. I think I was supposed to cut back late winter or earlier this spring. Is that right? Of course it is blooming now, and I don't want to cut it while it blooms. Can I cut it after it blooms? Then plant the cuttings? I'm sorry, I've asked this question before, but don't remember the thread or the answer. Thanks for all your help!
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Mother Teresa
Avatar for Guru1954
Apr 17, 2020 10:17 AM CST

General rule of thumb is to cut back lavenders a 1/3 of plant. You're plant being three years old there shouldn't be a problem. If it is showing sign's of woodiness near the base chop it now & re-feed. Have you pruned it before? These things grow like weed's & are hard to kill but do like a regular pruning for both flowering & shape. You can be a little bit ruthless in pruning but not being able to see the whole plant is a little bit hard for me to tell you how ruthless to be. You're plant is flowering healthily, but they do flower for a long time normally twice a year so you might forget ton prune inadvertently.
My advice on cuttings is a new minefield to venture in.

Regard's,
Guru 1954
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Apr 17, 2020 1:43 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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Thank You! actually that's two plants, planted close together. Yes it's getting a little woody you can't tell from the pic. Best guess on the height is maybe 2.5'. Here's a pic of the whole plants.
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Not near to quitting blooming.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for Guru1954
Apr 18, 2020 1:43 PM CST

Ok "Garden Fish" still a bit difficult to tell how woody they are around the base. Stoechas lavenders Spanish which is a sub-species of the group come in many different forms all are fast growing and some become noxious weeds in certain conditions, (Australia where I'm from is a classic example).
Can only give you the news that these types of lavenders are not like Angustifolia's (English) you must be prepared that these lavenders will be short lived. Also all lavenders these included like open spaces & not crowded by other plant's, fences etc, etc.
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Apr 18, 2020 3:47 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
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Thanks so much! The second one I've grown. The other one lasted 6 years; if I can get 3 more years out of these I'll be happy. I have planted a phenomenal this year; I think that's an English hybrid, an x intermedia.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for Guru1954
Apr 18, 2020 6:13 PM CST

Hey Gardenfish, had to look this one up, Ive been out of the game now for sometime, I was once a grower from what I can gather it's just a lamb dressed up as mutton in other words with the name phenomenal you will just have to wait and see if it meets expectations. I don't know to much about growing lavenders in your state I see you are from Arkansas if you have high humidity stick with the Stoechas if you indeed have chilly nights & cold winter's you may go with Angustifolias. Next time you are in your local nursery ask them if the "Phenomenal lavender" is acclimatized for your conditions would probably like a Ph of 7.5.

Regard's,
Guru1954.
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Apr 19, 2020 12:57 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
My best luck with any lavenders is to leave them alone after planting. Plant in an elevated position, amend dirt with sand, and no supplemental watering. We tend to have very wet winters here, cold enough for the English, but winter rot will kill them quick. Had that happen before. You know, ph is something I never worry about unless I'm growing something like blueberries. The last time my yard soil was tested, it was 6.8. It's good for nearly everything I grow in the ground. Yes, the stoechas has actually do better here, but the english can be grown with very good drainage.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
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