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Apr 15, 2020 3:58 PM CST
Name: Rosemary
Sacramento, CA (Zone 9b)
I don't think hybridizers have come up with a blue rose yet. Lavender is more like it. Blue Moon is listed in A Rose by Any Name by Douglas Brenner and Stepen Scanniello as being the bluest rose, although it is lavender. The book was published in 2009. Do you think Blue Moon would still hold the title of being "the bluest rose"?
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Apr 15, 2020 4:20 PM CST
Name: Seth n Sam .....
W.V. (Zone 6a)
I have Blue Girl. Its pretty lavender.
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Apr 15, 2020 5:12 PM CST
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
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'Reine de Violettes' is purty blue . . .
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Apr 15, 2020 6:02 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Region: Ukraine Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis
Irises Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Plant Database Moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level
Some of them fade to a nice blue. Rhapsody in Blue starts out almost purple and then fades to blue.



Blue for You does the same thing.



Blue Bajou can look quite blue.

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Apr 15, 2020 6:09 PM CST
Name: Rosemary
Sacramento, CA (Zone 9b)
Mmm, violet is actually my fave color, jerijen. And it probably is the "bluest " on the dk/bright closest to blue color spectrum.

Seth, I bought a Blue Girl at Home Depot this spring, and it's getting ready to bloom. The Rose pic is lighter than yours, and the bloom looks like it will be lilac with some pink:
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Last edited by reh0622 Apr 15, 2020 7:50 PM Icon for preview
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Apr 15, 2020 6:18 PM CST
Name: Rosemary
Sacramento, CA (Zone 9b)
Thank you, Zuzu! The blue ones you added are an interesting "blue!" Makes me want to grow them for something different.
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Apr 15, 2020 8:23 PM CST
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Garden Photography Region: Michigan Roses
Rosemary, watch out for those package pics. The colors are often off by a lot. The catalogs are too a lot of the time. They always put the MOST glorious pictures to lure you in! I also found on the ones that are sitting outside at the stores that the pics have faded out a lot from the sun. I bought what I thought was going to be a beautiful soft peach rose once that turned out to be glow- in-the-dark ORANGE, lol!

Reine des Violiette does often turn a kind of smoky blue for me. Blue Girl was lavender with pink undertones. There's nothing really truly blue but if you know that going in and except it there are lots of beautiful roses with blue in their names.
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Apr 16, 2020 5:44 AM CST
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Cat Lover Ferns Peppers
Roses Sedums Sempervivums
Part of the problem I gather for hybridizers is that the blue gene will not hold
in a rose so that is why we have purple roses and lavender roses but no blue roses.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
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Apr 16, 2020 6:01 AM CST
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
Blue for You

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I do have to say that within the late afternoon, when the rose faded, it turned the most ugly shade of grey you ever saw. Blue for You is with me no longer due to that. Blech!
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Apr 16, 2020 10:51 AM CST
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Cat Lover Ferns Peppers
Roses Sedums Sempervivums
Well, that is one reason that I have steered clear of growing
lavender and purple roses because here in Houston, TX with
the heat and humidity they tend to get black spot pretty badly.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
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Apr 16, 2020 2:27 PM CST
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Garden Photography Region: Michigan Roses
You are right, Will. There is no blue gene in roses naturally and when they try to introduce it there is no way of knowing where it will present itself, blue leaves, blue stem or blue flowers? And if it does present will it be stable or just do it once and revert? Genetics is a very iffy business. I know the Japanese have been trying to do this for a while, and they're pretty good at it, but have not been able to create a stable truly blue rose. I believe I read the gene they are trying to splice in is from blue pansies!
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Apr 16, 2020 9:29 PM CST
Name: Dennis Brown
The Big Island, Hawaii
I was told by somebody that Midnight Blue was as close as it gets.
Midnight Blue
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It should be called Midnight Purple.
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Apr 17, 2020 8:00 AM CST
Name: Sulli
Philadelphia (Zone 7a)
Seil is right, the geneticists have been working on this for YEARS with no luck. I'm a floral designer and my questions is always, Why do we need a blue rose? Blue is an incredibly challenging color in flowers, with it always skewing towards purple or gray even in delphinium and I've never had an occasion where all I needed was a true blue rose. Whenever I have clients who want blue, we look at all the options for real blue flowers and that usually satisfies them. Blue Moon spray roses actually complement blue flowers beautifully as do the pale lavenders that lean gray but of course that's a different setting than a garden. I'm partial to iris for smokey blues and foliage in blue green to bring in those colors to my beds.
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Apr 17, 2020 12:27 PM CST
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Cat Lover Ferns Peppers
Roses Sedums Sempervivums
I would thing the closest they might get is with a
blue ranunculus because their flowers look a lot
like an old garden rose bloom.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
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Apr 18, 2020 9:20 PM CST
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Garden Photography Region: Michigan Roses
I agree, Sulli. I don't see any real need for a blue rose. Or a black one for that matter. I think the colors they come in now are all beautiful as they are.

I'm sure they have tried different things, Will. It all depends on what genetic material is compatible I suppose.
Avatar for GardenDreaming
Mar 30, 2021 4:02 PM CST
Name: Holly
Baltimore, MD (Zone 7b)
seilMI said:Rosemary, watch out for those package pics. The colors are often off by a lot. The catalogs are too a lot of the time. They always put the MOST glorious pictures to lure you in! I also found on the ones that are sitting outside at the stores that the pics have faded out a lot from the sun. I bought what I thought was going to be a beautiful soft peach rose once that turned out to be glow- in-the-dark ORANGE, lol!

Reine des Violiette does often turn a kind of smoky blue for me. Blue Girl was lavender with pink undertones. There's nothing really truly blue but if you know that going in and except it there are lots of beautiful roses with blue in their names.


I completely agree with seilMI! Why is that advertisers always lie about purple/blue plants? So many times I have ordered a plant which appeared online or on a package photo as purple (my favorite color, and overwhelmingly the main color I plant in my garden,) only to find that the plant actually blooms deep red (my least favorite color!) Is it just a rare or difficult to breed color?
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Mar 30, 2021 5:01 PM CST
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Garden Photography Region: Michigan Roses
Hybridizers have been playing with the colors for centuries! It just depends on what color genes are available in each type of flower. Now days they can add genes but that's still experimental.

As for advertisers, well, they just want to sell product any way they can. All ad photos are Photoshopped to look their best. Have you ever gotten a Whopper that looked like the one on the TV, lol?!
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