Plant ID forum→Please help identify

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Kensington, MD
Brownmattc
Apr 19, 2020 2:17 PM CST
Does someone know what this plant is? It is about 3' tall and looks like it is party of the holly family. I have a couple in the yard of my new house and am wondering if I should keep them. Your assistance is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
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Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
Apr 19, 2020 2:24 PM CST
Mahonia?
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14th Dalai Lama
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Apr 19, 2020 2:25 PM CST
Maybe Mahonia bealei
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Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Apr 19, 2020 2:28 PM CST
It does resemble Leatherleaf Mahonia (Berberis bealei)






It's considered an invasive species in some areas. http://mdinvasives.org/iotm/ju...
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Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Apr 19, 2020 2:30 PM CST
Interesting what is considered invasive now, when I was in hort in 1967-71 it was considered a landscape plant.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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gardenfish
Apr 19, 2020 2:44 PM CST
It's used here as a landscape plant, but not in favor in recent years. There are some very fine ones at the Arkansas Tech University campus.
“ Be kind whenever possible”
14th Dalai Lama
Kensington, MD
Brownmattc
Apr 19, 2020 5:43 PM CST
Thank you very much! Maryland department of land resources has it listed in the following publication. This plant looks a little ragged and since it is invasive I guess it makes it an easy decision to remove it. I very much appreciate the help.

https://dnr.maryland.gov/wildl...
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
Apr 19, 2020 6:49 PM CST
Good choice, Brownmattc.

I like crawgarden's statement, as I didn't start in horticulture till some time after that - in the early '80s. Mahonia bealei was still considered a fine landscape plant - as was Euonymus alatus, Pyrus calleryana selections, Berberis thunbergii, Miscanthus sinensis, and a host of other species. While that Mahonia may be in a different category for most of us, the point is the same.

As gardeners, the point is to pay attention to what happens away from where you garden. You may not have pestiferous behavior in your maintained flower garden or landscaped beds, but over the back fence in the woods, forests, and natural areas there are things afoot that it pays each of us to notice. And to not make it worse.

Evergreen groundcovers are delectable in the home landscape. I know I probably planted acres of Vinca minor, Hedera helix, and Euonymus fortunei in my career as a horticulturist and landscape manager in the '80s and '90s. But none since. AND, I've been more than busy trying to eradicate the volunteers of Euonymus fortunei, Lonicera japonica, and Lonicera maackii that wish to infest the woods emerging here at the Valley.

There's a lesson here for most of us. We can grow - or try - just about anything. While we're doing so, let's leave good things and good places for those who get to learn, try, and succeed after we return to our component molecules as fertilizer.
John
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
Apr 19, 2020 11:51 PM CST
John, a very wise post. I'm the chair for my local MG plant sale, and I had a very nasty argument with another member about accepting invasive plants for the sale. The plant in question was nandina. I told her I would not be accepting any, but to be aware there were invasive and noninvasive ones. The point is; any plant came become invasive given certain cultural and climatic conditions. Yes, there are general lists of " invasive" plants, but they may be fine in, for example, Maryland, but a rampant invasive here in Arkansas. The list cannot be limited to developed garden plants, either. Some natives, while kept in bounds by conditions in the wild, become terribly invasive when planted in the garden. I'm experiencing problems with two natives in my garden right now.
What I find interesting is that many plants on general invasive lists that are accepted as invasive throughout the country are Asian imports. Privet, wisteria, kudzu, just a few that come to mind. Oh, and honeysuckle.
My personal hate? Ivy and vinca minor. I've been pulling that out 5 years now where I live.
“ Be kind whenever possible”
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