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Georgia
gokult
Apr 30, 2020 4:11 PM CST
Hi all! I have two dischidia (a dischidia imbricata and a dischidia pectinoides) that I'm a bit worried about. I couldn't find much for acute problems on the net, and so I just wanted to see if anybody here had any opinions!

My dischidia pectinoides has a few strands that are limp and the leaves are a bit wrinkly; the new growth was yellow and fell off easily. The rest of the vines are in good shape and turgid! I don't believe it's overwatering, as I have only watered it once in the past few weeks since receiving it (watered thoroughly), and I've been misting it regularly/multiple times a day. I know they're epiphytes so they like moisture from the air, but I went ahead and watered since I saw a lot of varying info for watering (some say moist soil, others say it should be dry, etc.). I'm worried the wrinkling is from my bad watering haha.

I'm having a similar issue with my imbricata. When I received it, the soil was already pretty moist, so I was a bit thrown off in terms of what conditions it likes. I haven't watered it since then because the soil is still a bit damp, and I don't want to overdo it. I also mist it regularly.

I've included pics of the two plants (pectinoides first, then the imbricata) and sort of the "problem" vines. I don't know if the yellowing is obvious, but hopefully it helps! Any advice for watering would be much appreciated!!!
Thumb of 2020-04-30/gokult/ad14e9


Thumb of 2020-04-30/gokult/bc055c


Thumb of 2020-04-30/gokult/d5b755

(Below is just the full plant).

Thumb of 2020-04-30/gokult/8bab04


Thumb of 2020-04-30/gokult/a21cfc

Full plant below! This one looks relatively fine to be honest, I just wanna double check the watering haha!
Thumb of 2020-04-30/gokult/fce642

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Apr 30, 2020 5:03 PM CST
The problem is the soil is not drying fast enough. Epiphytes get drenched and are dry in an hour. Your soil needs to be faster drying - the Dischidia are suffering because they have damp toes for too long. You may want to repot. Use the pots they came in but replace the soil with something fast draining and fast drying.

We all have our favorite potting mediums: Orchid bark, cactus soil with lots of perlite, ground cork...

I don't think you need to mist daily, Georgia is probably humid enough.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Georgia
gokult
Apr 30, 2020 5:39 PM CST
DaisyI said:The problem is the soil is not drying fast enough. Epiphytes get drenched and are dry in an hour. Your soil needs to be faster drying - the Dischidia are suffering because they have damp toes for too long. You may want to repot. Use the pots they came in but replace the soil with something fast draining and fast drying.

We all have our favorite potting mediums: Orchid bark, cactus soil with lots of perlite, ground cork...

I don't think you need to mist daily, Georgia is probably humid enough.


Hi Daisyl, thank you so much for your reply/advice! I'll definitely look into replacing the soil for my imbricata:-) Do you think that the drying time is true for the pectinoides too? I bought it from a place that planted it in well aerated soil, fast draining soil (cactus soil, perlite, coconut husk I think). I only recently thoroughly watered it, and when I checked today it seemed relatively "dry" (a small bit of moisture was retained). Would you recommend repotting this one too?

Also, should I just water both of these plants when the soil is dry, or should I space it out more?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Apr 30, 2020 5:48 PM CST
Water when the soil is dry. Cactus soil, perlite and coconut husk sound pretty perfect to me, but is that the plant you are worried about? Plants need time to acclimate to their new surroundings so maybe they will be fine without any repotting.

I'm confused about which plant is which. Sorry!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
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Gina1960
Apr 30, 2020 5:59 PM CST
I grow both of these plants. Daisy is right. My imbricata grows as a total epiphyte that had a couple strands established in a shell. The bulk climbs a totem to a height of 12 ft off the ground. My pectinoides grows out of 2 slabs of a coconut with sphagnum moss in-between. It has wound itself around the wire hanger it is suspended from and also goes up about 12 feet. I water then both DAILY. Because they dry out very quickly.
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Georgia
gokult
Apr 30, 2020 6:32 PM CST
HAHA Daisy, I don't blame you. 😅 I didn't do a great job establishing which is which. The one I'm more worried about is the pectinoides (in the terra-cotta pot), and it's also the one in the well draining soil with all the perlite and coconut husks. The imbricata (hanging plant) doesn't seem to be doing too bad, but like you and Gina said, it's probs not great that the soil is still damp. I'll have to look into repotting it so it's a bit happier! I'm wondering if maybe the pectinoides vines that are unhappy are either still adjusting or just older vines, because otherwise I'm not sure what's wrong with it. It didn't sit in damp soil like the imbricata but it has a bit more wrinkling/yellow new growth🤷🏻‍♀️

And thank you for your input Gina! Do you think I should repot the imbricata into better draining soil and it'll do better? For the most part it seems pretty happy and still is growing, I just noticed one little strand that wrinkled up oddly at the end with a yellow leaf, but the rest of the vine seemed fine. (I hope that makes sense.) otherwise, I could transplant them onto sphagnum (I have ANOTHER imbricata that grows happily on that), but I've never had to transfer a plant like that before.🤭
Sorry for all the questions!! I just don't want to kill them😬
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Apr 30, 2020 6:39 PM CST
Actually the BEST way to grow imbricata is to mount it. You can mount it onto something like tree fern, cork, or even a wood board covered in coir mat. They like to climb. I will try and take photos of mine tomorrow....its hard because they climb so high up
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Georgia
gokult
Apr 30, 2020 7:28 PM CST
Ooh Gina, honestly I'd just love to see the picture in general!! I definitely want to consider mounting it in the future (I don't have the stuff for it right now), but for now I'll try to maybe aerate the soil? I have some coconut husks I bought, but I unfortunately don't have any perlite on hand. Hopefully that'll help!

Thanks to the both of you for your advice and opinion:-)

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