Propagation forum→Variegated Monstera cutting - advice/possible rot??

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molnoelle
May 2, 2020 7:22 AM CST
I recently got a beautiful cutting of a variegated monstera and I am terrified of failing it. It's only been a couple of days and the person I got it from told me just to root it in water, but I am noticing where the cutting was taken seems to be black and I'm worried about it rotting (see photo). I know he dipped it in cinnamon before giving it to me but I'm not sure if that makes much of a difference?

Am I being paranoid or is something wrong? If so, what can I do to save it? I have a very small amount of sphagnum moss and I know that it's possible to propagate that way, but I'm not sure if I have enough. I'm fairly new to propagation in general and have never done so with a monstera - any advice is SO appreciated and thank you ahead of time!



Thumb of 2020-05-02/molnoelle/457c16
Thumb of 2020-05-02/molnoelle/282332

Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
May 3, 2020 5:47 PM CST
No you definitely have rot starting.

PLEASE don;t think I am trying to be snarky here. I'm not. I just really do not understand why, when people have lovely adventitious roots on their cutting like you have, you think that there is a need to 'root it' further. There really isn't.

If you just plant the cutting in a loose well draining mix with both of those roots under the soil, it should start to root and grow. It may take a while. The adventitious roots have to get the message from Monstera central that it is now their new job to make some more roots, and get the plant started. But they will.

You don;t have a lot of tissue between your cut end and your first root. You should treat that with a good fungicide (NOT cinnamon) and pot that up in a small container. Don;t drown it. Just keep it evenly moist. And don't get curious to see if its rooting and pull it up after a week. Just to check. It takes PATIENCE.

Water rooting attempts will only screw this cutting up, IMO

Monstera are what are called 'primary hemi-epiphytes'. They do not begin their lives rooted in the ground. They begin life as total epiphytes when a seed germinates on a host structure. They have the ability to NEVER have a trunk that grows from out of the ground. If you leave the cut end of your cutting out in top and lay the cutting sideways so the roots go into the soil, it might be even better than planting the cut end under the soil.
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molnoelle
May 6, 2020 11:35 AM CST
Thank you for your informative and helpful response!

I've never tried propagating a Monstera before and the person I got this lovely cutting from has huge, beautiful plants so I took his advice and put it in water - I don't think I'll be trying that again. I've since moved it into sphagnum moss and it seems to be doing okay, but I may try to pot it up after what you've told me! Fingers crossed.

Gina1960 said:No you definitely have rot starting.

PLEASE don;t think I am trying to be snarky here. I'm not. I just really do not understand why, when people have lovely adventitious roots on their cutting like you have, you think that there is a need to 'root it' further. There really isn't.

If you just plant the cutting in a loose well draining mix with both of those roots under the soil, it should start to root and grow. It may take a while. The adventitious roots have to get the message from Monstera central that it is now their new job to make some more roots, and get the plant started. But they will.

You don;t have a lot of tissue between your cut end and your first root. You should treat that with a good fungicide (NOT cinnamon) and pot that up in a small container. Don;t drown it. Just keep it evenly moist. And don't get curious to see if its rooting and pull it up after a week. Just to check. It takes PATIENCE.

Water rooting attempts will only screw this cutting up, IMO

Monstera are what are called 'primary hemi-epiphytes'. They do not begin their lives rooted in the ground. They begin life as total epiphytes when a seed germinates on a host structure. They have the ability to NEVER have a trunk that grows from out of the ground. If you leave the cut end of your cutting out in top and lay the cutting sideways so the roots go into the soil, it might be even better than planting the cut end under the soil.


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