Houseplants forum→Begonia Rex a little leggy?

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New York
phaytekins
May 2, 2020 6:05 PM CST
Hello all and thanks in advance for opinions and help! I posted once before for help with my rex and a purple waffle plant I had living together. Today I felt it was finally Spring enough to safely repot them separately so they could live more comfortably (I had not realized just how much spread the waffle would have and felt very bad for my poor begonia)

Well my new concern is this, now that she's on her own I am noticing just how leggy and droopy she looks. Is this normal for a freshly repotted begonia? How can I fix this safely? Or is this just her new look because I left her too long trying to get away from the waffle?

Edit:: not sure why the pictures are flipped. They're the correct way in my phone. Sorry!

Thumb of 2020-05-03/phaytekins/c2df34
Thumb of 2020-05-03/phaytekins/dfdcb6

[Last edited by phaytekins - May 2, 2020 6:06 PM (+)]
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
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sallyg
May 3, 2020 5:57 AM CST
They are sort of soft, I suspect it had to grow a bit long to get out of the other plant, and now not supported by competing stems, is left like this. New leaves might stand up better.. Shrug! I'm no pro on these. I have killed a couple so I resist the temptation to buy again.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
May 3, 2020 8:31 AM CST
Repotting is often stressful for plants and depends on how much of the original soil was removed and how much damage was done to the root hairs in the process. That will determine how long it takes for your Rex to recover.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
New York
phaytekins
May 3, 2020 2:34 PM CST
WillC said:Repotting is often stressful for plants and depends on how much of the original soil was removed and how much damage was done to the root hairs in the process. That will determine how long it takes for your Rex to recover.


It has a lot of the original dirt because the roots seemed kind of fragile and thin and I didn't want to tear them too badly. But I did pat it off so the ends will be growing into the new soil instead of into themselves.

Is there anything in particular to do to help it recover faster? Extra food? Prop up the droopy leggy bit? Or is it just safest to leave her and keep everything normal rather than change too much at once?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 3, 2020 7:23 PM CST
Everyone has a different way to go about repotting so it is hard to give particular advice without knowing all the details. Make sure it was watered well after the repotting. Then do your best to provide a good balance of moisture and oxygen around the roots by keeping the soil damp but not wet.

Sometimes stems can be propped up by tamping the soil down tighter at the base of the stems.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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