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Avatar for AbdurRafay
May 4, 2020 3:48 AM CST

So I found a worm in my snake plant when I was fertilizing it, can anyone tell me what type of worm it is and if it's dangerous and if so how to get rid of it
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May 4, 2020 5:56 AM CST
Name: Di
Ontario, Canada (Zone 5a)
Birds Region: Canadian Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters
It looks like an ordinary earthworm. Did you by chance use any soil from the ground outside? I made the mistake many years ago of digging up a cute little plant from my garden and putting it in my terrarium. All of a sudden I was seeing baby worms along the glass. Had to pitch the whole thing and start fresh. Sighing!
"There is a crack, a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in." Leonard Cohen
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May 4, 2020 6:13 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
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I has a beautiful peace lily that was very healthy and had many blooms on it all the time. It eventually outgrew it's pot, and when I repotted it, I found nightcrawlers in it! It spent the nice weather outside; I suspect that's where they came from. I'm attributing the plants health to the worms; peace lilies can be hard to grow. They won't hurt your plant.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for AbdurRafay
May 4, 2020 8:06 AM CST

Is it something of concern, should I try to get rid of them, and no I bought it potted not from soil outside
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May 4, 2020 9:10 AM CST
Name: Di
Ontario, Canada (Zone 5a)
Birds Region: Canadian Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters
I did a bit of a google search as I had no idea, but found the topic interesting. They shouldn't do any damage if they have enough organic matter to eat, but a lot of potting soil is low on organic matter, and they may go after the roots if they get overcrowded. If you get too many worms they may start to leave the pot to search for greener pastures as they would do outside. I'm afraid the Yuck factor would get to me personally and I'd have to replace the soil. Interesting topic and wondering what other peoples opinions are. Apparently some people do put them in their pots.
"There is a crack, a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in." Leonard Cohen
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May 4, 2020 9:23 AM CST
Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
Amaryllis Region: United Kingdom Houseplants Frogs and Toads Foliage Fan I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Container Gardener Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Annuals Bee Lover
Insects and worms are normal. Most, especially things like earthworms will not harm your plants. When we put our plants outide it is inevitable that critters will find them.
Avatar for AbdurRafay
May 4, 2020 12:28 PM CST

rosebuddy2 said:I did a bit of a google search as I had no idea, but found the topic interesting. They shouldn't do any damage if they have enough organic matter to eat, but a lot of potting soil is low on organic matter, and they may go after the roots if they get overcrowded. If you get too many worms they may start to leave the pot to search for greener pastures as they would do outside. I'm afraid the Yuck factor would get to me personally and I'd have to replace the soil. Interesting topic and wondering what other peoples opinions are. Apparently some people do put them in their pots.


Thank you soo much for your replies. And what I've been doing is I've been putting all my organic waste material (such as peels) in my plants, so I hope they are fine with that
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May 4, 2020 11:18 PM CST
Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
Amaryllis Region: United Kingdom Houseplants Frogs and Toads Foliage Fan I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Container Gardener Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Annuals Bee Lover
If you're putting "waste" into your plant pots you've answered your own question. Earthworms help break down organic matter in soil, so they would be attracted to the pots. There is no need to do this, and Sansevieria in general don't need fertilizer.
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May 6, 2020 8:49 AM CST
Name: 'CareBear'

Amaryllis Cactus and Succulents Dog Lover Hostas Irises Region: Pennsylvania
Sempervivums
First time I'm hearing this in a snake plant. First it's got to be red worms not earth worms. Earth worms need cool or cold soil to live. It's the red worms that is used to recycle waist to soil and it's very good. But the soil must be kept moist not wet for the worms to survive. In my snake plants, the soil is kept too dry for them. The basic question is that it's not harmful but is very good for the plant. So if the plant is doing well in this moist conditions your keeping it in them keep it up. One hard drying time is enough to slow or stop the worms life cycle.
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May 6, 2020 9:22 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
I think when you say earthworms needing cool soil you are really talking about night crawlers. Red wrigglers don't typically live through the winter in many areas. There is a common earthworm that lives nearly everywhere.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
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May 7, 2020 9:59 AM CST
Name: 'CareBear'

Amaryllis Cactus and Succulents Dog Lover Hostas Irises Region: Pennsylvania
Sempervivums
Yes Lynda that's exactly what I meant. Thank you.
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May 7, 2020 4:15 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
You're very welcome! I thought that was it. I use the nightcrawlers from my garden to fish with! They catch a lot of fish. Whistling
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
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May 8, 2020 7:49 AM CST
Name: 'CareBear'

Amaryllis Cactus and Succulents Dog Lover Hostas Irises Region: Pennsylvania
Sempervivums
Seems nightcrawlers (earthworms) are a favorite for many animals. My turtles would stand up on two legs for one. Red worms are good too but got to watch out for the dun worm. Looks almost like a red worm but brownish and stinks. Nothing eats it twice.
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