Landscape Design forum→Proportion of trees

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Name: Lee-Roy
Bilzen, Belgium (Zone 8a)
Irises Lilies Hostas Ferns Composter Region: Belgium
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: Europe
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Arico
May 4, 2020 5:53 PM CST
Hello,

After three years of googling, searching, analyzing etc I once again turn to the community because I just can't make up my mind/keep doubting.

My question: what is the maximum height a tree can 'be' in my garden aka what maximum height is the most aesthetically pleasing and practical for my particular space (dimensions).

My garden is about 14m x 90m (42 by 270 ft), but I have no idea what (at maturity) size tree I can plant. The minimum I want is 5-6m, but the particular specimens I'm really keen on (Fagus, Ostrya, Carpinus) usually reach 15m. Those are big ass trees! Blinking And the info regarding eventual height is all over the place Thumbs down
I could go for Acer japonica/palmatum, but these takes decades to grow or a hell of alot of money Sad

I've posted a similar thread a while ago regarding other maples, but still doubtful...

Suggestions are always welcome.

PS: NO CONIFERS OR EVERGREENS!
Name: Lee-Roy
Bilzen, Belgium (Zone 8a)
Irises Lilies Hostas Ferns Composter Region: Belgium
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: Europe
Image
Arico
May 11, 2020 2:03 PM CST
....................... Glare
Missouri (Zone 6a)
Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Frillylily
May 11, 2020 6:12 PM CST
Beings that you are not in the US it's hard to answer, here for a small garden we plant dogwoods, crepe myrtles, red buds, crab apples or service berry, or ornamental cherry trees. Not sure how those would work where you are or if you have access to them. I planted a common bloodgood maple and it seems to be growing faster than I thought it would. They are alot more affordable than some of the other ones. I have an amur maple in the front, they are supposed to stay smaller also and it was not expensive. It has grown fast, has sterile seeds and great fall color. Flame I think is it's name.
Name: John
Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a)
Photo Contest Winner 2019 Avid Green Pages Reviewer
jathton
May 12, 2020 11:44 PM CST
Before I posted any recommendations I wanted to know what kind of climate you live in. Judging from Google's info I gather it doesn't get obscenely hot or cold in Bilzen and that you have almost regularly scheduled rainfall throughout the year. If your soil doesn't stay wet year-round... if it drains well after the rain... you seem to be in a position to grow quite a few trees that will meet, but not exceed, the mature sizes you are looking for.

Frillylily made an excellent suggestion when she mentioned Amur Maple. This is a beautiful tree. Matures around 20 feet with a crown that is wider than tall. Good, green tri-lobed leaves in spring and summer... turning fiery red in fall. Branches fairly close to the ground... thus assuming a multi-trunk look. Creamy white flowers in April and May... followed by bright red samaras [seedpods] later in summer. Smooth gray bark. Visually and horticulturally this is an excellent small tree.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/2702f6

Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/a89763


You might also consider flowering crabapples... particularly a species named Sargent's Crabapple [Malus sargentii.] This small tree usually will not exceed 8-12 feet in height... but it's crown can spread to 15-18 feet. It has a decidedly oriental, windswept look that is very attractive. Bright pink flower buds are followed by snow white flowers... in turn followed by dark red 1/2 inch fruit that stays on the tree to be consumed by birds in fall. Good yellow fall color.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/fddb97

Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/432b59

Other crabapples worthy of consideration are:
'Prairifire'': red-budded with dark pinkish red flowers. Highly resistant to disease. Grows 20 feet high and wide.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/471cca


'Weeping Candied Apple': Red buds and white flowers. Persistent [stays on tree] cherry-red fruit. Broad, pendulous branches. Grows 10-15 feet.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/9bee48


This last one is a tree I have only seen in pictures... but I have wanted one every time I've seen those pictures… one in particular stands out.
Michael Dirr, in Dirr's Hardy Trees & Shrubs, explains why: "…over most of the United States the flowering performance of this hybrid species does not measure up to that of specimens growing in cooler, more even climates, like that of England, where there is greater bud set and flowering."

Because you live in a climate that sounds conducive to this tree's success I want you to see what Rosemary Verey did with this tree at her home. She created a walkway over which she created a pergola… on which she planted lots of these trees. The last picture is a poor copy of one in a book… you should look up "Laburnum Walk" on Google and tap images to see better photos of this walk.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/f87b33

Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/a7e757

I'll stop here. I have a few more ideas if you're interested
Name: Lee-Roy
Bilzen, Belgium (Zone 8a)
Irises Lilies Hostas Ferns Composter Region: Belgium
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: Europe
Image
Arico
May 13, 2020 5:48 PM CST
jathton said:Before I posted any recommendations I wanted to know what kind of climate you live in. Judging from Google's info I gather it doesn't get obscenely hot or cold in Bilzen and that you have almost regularly scheduled rainfall throughout the year. If your soil doesn't stay wet year-round... if it drains well after the rain... you seem to be in a position to grow quite a few trees that will meet, but not exceed, the mature sizes you are looking for.

Frillylily made an excellent suggestion when she mentioned Amur Maple. This is a beautiful tree. Matures around 20 feet with a crown that is wider than tall. Good, green tri-lobed leaves in spring and summer... turning fiery red in fall. Branches fairly close to the ground... thus assuming a multi-trunk look. Creamy white flowers in April and May... followed by bright red samaras [seedpods] later in summer. Smooth gray bark. Visually and horticulturally this is an excellent small tree.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/2702f6

Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/a89763


You might also consider flowering crabapples... particularly a species named Sargent's Crabapple [Malus sargentii.] This small tree usually will not exceed 8-12 feet in height... but it's crown can spread to 15-18 feet. It has a decidedly oriental, windswept look that is very attractive. Bright pink flower buds are followed by snow white flowers... in turn followed by dark red 1/2 inch fruit that stays on the tree to be consumed by birds in fall. Good yellow fall color.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/fddb97

Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/432b59

Other crabapples worthy of consideration are:
'Prairifire'': red-budded with dark pinkish red flowers. Highly resistant to disease. Grows 20 feet high and wide.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/471cca


'Weeping Candied Apple': Red buds and white flowers. Persistent [stays on tree] cherry-red fruit. Broad, pendulous branches. Grows 10-15 feet.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/9bee48


This last one is a tree I have only seen in pictures... but I have wanted one every time I've seen those pictures… one in particular stands out.
Michael Dirr, in Dirr's Hardy Trees & Shrubs, explains why: "…over most of the United States the flowering performance of this hybrid species does not measure up to that of specimens growing in cooler, more even climates, like that of England, where there is greater bud set and flowering."

Because you live in a climate that sounds conducive to this tree's success I want you to see what Rosemary Verey did with this tree at her home. She created a walkway over which she created a pergola… on which she planted lots of these trees. The last picture is a poor copy of one in a book… you should look up "Laburnum Walk" on Google and tap images to see better photos of this walk.
Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/f87b33

Thumb of 2020-05-13/jathton/a7e757

I'll stop here. I have a few more ideas if you're interested


Thank you for all that troubles you've went through.

I live in a temperate oceanic climate (zone 8a) indeed with regular rainfall throughout the year, although the past few have been less stable and more extreme on both ends: last summer was hot and dry for weeks putting groundwater levels at critical. This past winter has been wet with 6 weeks of non-stop rain for the end of Januari and whole of February. April has been extremely warm - regularly above 20°C - and practically no rain; now it's the middle of May and we've had a few nights with frost which is unusual though not impossible, but still unwelcome (my beans fried Glare )

Anyway, I'm very particular about what I do and don't like.

Don't: exaggerated, over the top flowering like Malus, Morus, Pyrus, Prunus, Crataeus, Viburnum etc so that rules out alot of possibilities Rolling on the floor laughing Als don't like big flowers like Magnolia or Liriodendron.
No evergreens and conifers either Sticking tongue out

Do: subtle/inconspicuous flowering and deciduousness: Fagus, Quercus, Betula, Acer, Ostrya, Carpinus, Ostryopsis, Alnus...

We'll see Smiling
Name: John
Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a)
Photo Contest Winner 2019 Avid Green Pages Reviewer
jathton
May 13, 2020 6:16 PM CST
Best Wishes !!!

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