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Avatar for Aelitka
May 5, 2020 1:18 PM CST
Poland, Lower Silesia
Hello,
I am writing because one of my Mulberry Trees has been attacked by a weird white - egg shaped - plates-corrupt.
It has slowly spread more and more over the trees branches and is slowly killing the tree.
I am not sure if it can still be saved, but I have been looking over the internet for some information on what can that possibly be but found nothing.
Have any of You ever seen something similar to this and knows how to fight it?

I appreciate all help and information and have attached the pictures.
Thank you in advance!

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May 5, 2020 1:40 PM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
If you need to relax, grow plants!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
It is probably some kind of fungus that is destroying the tree. It is a huge old tree and mulberries do not live for a long time. The time to treat it was when you first noticed the problem. I think by now it is too far gone!
What ever living tissue that is still there I don't think will support the tree through any kind of treatment. I wouldn't even bother to try and save it. The treatment would have to be aggressive and very expensive and I would think that it has less then a 5% chance of surviving.
But that is just one person's opinion.
Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
Last edited by BigBill May 5, 2020 1:41 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for luis_pr
May 5, 2020 1:45 PM CST
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Azaleas Salvias Roses Plumerias Region: New Hampshire Hydrangeas
Hibiscus Region: Georgia Region: Florida Dog Lover Region: Texas
After 20+ years, the old mulberries in my neighborhood have had several issues too; many have been slowly replaced. Mine had rot in two large branches so I opted to cut it down in case winds may make it fall.
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May 5, 2020 3:08 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
are y'all sure that isn't lichen?

we need more pictures... is there any leaves on the tree?
Avatar for Aelitka
May 5, 2020 9:39 PM CST
Poland, Lower Silesia
There are some new leaves starting to grow. Some more pictures.
Thumb of 2020-05-06/Aelitka/5fc540



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Avatar for luis_pr
May 6, 2020 12:47 AM CST
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Azaleas Salvias Roses Plumerias Region: New Hampshire Hydrangeas
Hibiscus Region: Georgia Region: Florida Dog Lover Region: Texas
Good eye, that is lichen. The close-up threw me off. Aesthetically speaking, they may not be not pleasing sometimes but, they are harmless to plant life. However, they can crop up in some unexpected plants/trees when there is something quite not right. If I cannot explain to myself why they are there, I treat it as a "hmm" or "heads up" alert.

Check to see if the tree is getting sufficient sunlight. Over here, I had a fruitless mulberry tree planted in full sun conditions. But I see a few in neighbor's yards that get 1/2 a days worth of sun. Check to see if the tree is getting too much water (the soil feels wet or soggy when you insert a finger into the soil) or if the soil is not draining the water fast enough. You could also check for water leaks from pipes or the sprinkler system (the area is always wet for example).

Lichen like having a source of water (naturally humid and or rainy locations, foggy places, etc); clean air; food (obtained from bacteria in the environment); and a "surface" to call home (that is the only thing that the tree is providing for them).
Last edited by luis_pr May 6, 2020 1:01 AM Icon for preview
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May 6, 2020 1:01 AM CST
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
luis_pr said:Good eye, that is lichen. Aesthetically not pleasing sometimes but harmless. It can crop up in some unexpected plants/trees when there is something quite not right; if I cannot explain to myself why it is there, I treat it as a "hmm" or "heads up" alert.

Check to see if the tree is getting sufficient sunlight. Check to see if the tree is getting too much water (the soil feels wet or soggy when you insert a finger into the soil) or the soil is not draining the water fast enough. You could also check for water leaks from pipes or the sprinkler system (the area is always wet for example).

They like having a source of water (naturally humid and or rainy locations, foggy places, etc); clean air; food (obtained from bacterias in the environment); and a "surface" to call home (that is the only thing that the tree is providing for them).


Much as I liked the mulberry tree I planted 30 years ago and cut down after 10 years, you might be glad for it to die. Its invasive, birds spread the seeds, and the fallen berries stain your shoes when you return to the house. Mine spread to a neighbor's yard and it overhangs my flowerbed and keeps sending up saplings. It is a curse to me.
Avatar for Aelitka
May 6, 2020 1:22 AM CST
Poland, Lower Silesia
Is there a way to remove it?
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May 6, 2020 1:54 AM CST
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Aelitka said:Is there a way to remove it?


If the tree is in your yard, cut the roots. Cut the trunk. Drill holes in the cut trunk, Fill the holes with herbicide if you are inorganic or milk if you are organic (milk supports microbes). Both seem to work. Cover the cut trunk with black plastic. Snip off any shoots until the roots are exhausted or dead.
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May 6, 2020 4:53 AM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
If you need to relax, grow plants!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
I think that they want to remove the lichen, not the tree.
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
Avatar for Aelitka
May 6, 2020 5:02 AM CST
Poland, Lower Silesia
Thanks you. Actually yes I want to remove lichen, but now if I have to remove the tree I also know how. Smiling so is there a way to remove lichen?
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May 6, 2020 5:15 AM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
If you need to relax, grow plants!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
You could remove them with a stream of water and a soft brush. If they are lichen, they will return but slowly over a few years. Lichens to the degree that you have them is an indicator of a healthy environment.

But I still think that they are fungal fruiting bodies. Lichens have some color to them in my experience. They range from paler grays to darker grays, gray/green, greenish, golden green, golden gray. But in this case they are white, like rice. Fungal bodies are white because they do not have chlorophyll. Cholorphyll imparts the greenish color to plants. Lichens are a combination of a fungus and an algae. There should be some color!
If you clean them off and they return within months, that will confirm fungal bodies from within a dying tree. Good luck!
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
Last edited by BigBill May 6, 2020 5:17 AM Icon for preview
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May 6, 2020 7:14 AM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
I like lichen... it doesn't harm the tree...
At my house, I see lichen on trees that aren't leafing out like they should...

the lichen is merely a symptom that there's something wrong.

Rather than trying to remove anything... tell people that you are expecting Santa... He eats cookies, his reindeer eat lichen.
Avatar for luis_pr
May 6, 2020 9:03 AM CST
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Azaleas Salvias Roses Plumerias Region: New Hampshire Hydrangeas
Hibiscus Region: Georgia Region: Florida Dog Lover Region: Texas
Spray a solution of one tablespoon/15 ml of vinegar mixed to a gallon/3.8 liters water. See if that helps get rid of the lichen.
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May 6, 2020 10:09 AM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
If you need to relax, grow plants!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
Lichen is an indicator of a healthy environment. Why do you want to get rid of it?
Because it doesn't look good or is messy? Hey, welcome to the world of gardening. Not everything looks perfect all the time.
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
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