Ask a Question forum→Dipladenia Rio overwintered in NY. Preparing for spring.

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Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
May 5, 2020 2:20 PM CST
So I've been reading up.
I had them in my largest mixed planters last year and they overwintered really well inside, and I'm seeing new growth now that their room is warmer and days longer.

But now I HEAR they hate to be rootbound and will stop blooming if so. I don't have bigger pots (and I'm not going out to buy them because there's no more room.) so now I'm not sure what to do with them. I really love the way they look in group planters... but now I'm realizing that's probably not gonna be possible with the size they are now...

I tried ground layering some shoots beginning 4-6. Today I dug up one of the woody stemmed nodes and one green vine node I covered. Woody stem has one tiny root... nothing on the green.

I HEAR ( I keep stressing this word, because it's just stuff I read online and I'm hoping for some first hand experience from people here..)
that they are very difficult to root from air layering, almost impossible from green cuttings, and difficult, but possible from woody stem cuttings. I'm not great at rooting from cuttings anyway.

So what do you know about how they feel about being rootbound and blooming? What about propigation from cuttings? I'm almost thinking it's too late for that. If it takes 6-8 weeks to root, we're talking mid July before I get my first blooms even if cuttings are successful...
I just don't know what to do with them right now. I hate to think I did all the maintenance and took up so much space for something I may have to ditch anyway...
The plural of anecdote is not data.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
May 6, 2020 10:11 AM CST
Hi Paula - I do have some limited experience with Diplandia (Mandevilla).

There are many folks out there that have never seen a plant they don't want to repot! Repotting does discourage flowering in general. Of course, if a plant is badly potbound and the soil is getting too dry, that will discourage flowering. As long as you can keep the soil properly moist and the roots properly hydrated, then it doesn't need a bigger pot.

Congratulations on getting yours through the winter months. Not easy!

This is a naturally vining or climbing plant that does grow very long vines that will take up a lot of space. A good trellis and regular pruning are the best solutions to excessive growth. However, because they tend to bloom in the warmer months and only on older growth, it is generally best to do the pruning in the fall or right after flowering, not now.

In my experience, the easiest way to propagate Diplandia is by taking short tip cuttings with 2-4 pairs of leaves. Let the white sap dry for about an hour in the open air before inserting them in a small pot filled with damp potting mix and keep them in a humid environment. It may be necessary to enclose the pot with cuttings inside a clear plastic bag to maintain the humidity as well as the moisture in the potting mix. Using rooting hormone and bottom heat are also helpful in getting them to root. I have never tried air-layering them.

I hope that's helpful. Let us know about your success and how you accomplished it.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
[Last edited by WillC - May 8, 2020 8:01 AM (+)]
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Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
May 8, 2020 7:53 AM CST
Thanks Will. I always think it's a good rule of thumb not to repot unless it's necessary... I try not to do anything unless it's necessary. you can say that about most things plant... too much is often worse that not enough.

It's nice to know that as long as I keep them properly hydrated I have a good shot at having decent looking plants this summer. Do you know if they're heavy feeders or like it lean?

The good news is I never pot directly in my big outdoor planters that I update each year. I always plant in a nursery pot that I place inside the larger decorative pots. So while these babies won't be in mixed containers like I hoped, it will be easy enough to pull them out in their pots and put them somewhere else.


As soon as I get my seedlings in the ground next week I'll have an empty spot I can try rooting them. I have an old 55 gallon fish tank (48" x 12" footprint 21" high) that I use like a mini greenhouse to keep humidity high without causing rot.

I want one node stripped of leaves hormoned and buried and the tip with its two leaves above the soil, right?

I'm not sure if the green tips I have now are going to be any good for rooting. They are extremely leggy, w long thin stems between nodes and very small leaves.
It's hard to find a decent picture, because I've been cutting them off like crazy to try and encourage more new sprouts lower down.. is it worth trying with these? or am I wasting my time before nice fat summer growth?
The plural of anecdote is not data.
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
May 8, 2020 8:02 AM CST
Im not sure what to do with these.. i know you usually want small amounts of leaves on a cutting, but this is obviously ridiculous. Is it important to have the growing tip? Or will any set of nodes work? It just seems to me like these stems are too flimsy to make it.
Thumb of 2020-05-08/Turbosaurus/ba51fb

The plural of anecdote is not data.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 8, 2020 8:13 AM CST
I like your philosophy of doing less rather than more. When I first started working professionally, I discovered that time and space limited what I could do. I soon learned that the plants benefited from those limits.

Feeding depends on how long it has been in the same soil and how fast and vigorously it is growing. But I don't think it will make a significant difference.

"I want one node stripped of leaves hormoned and buried and the tip with its two leaves above the soil, right? " - Yes.

Younger tip cuttings generally are more vigorous than older stem cuttings. As long as you are trimming them off anyway, trying propagating them in water or damp soil or whatever. See what seems to work and let us know. (Sorry, I can't advise you on how to best use your time! Hilarious! )
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 8, 2020 8:16 AM CST
I just saw the new photo. I agree that they are too spindly to bother with.

Any node is capable of producing roots if it is handled well. Older stem cuttings take longer to propagate, so they may require "tenting" to prevent dehydration while the roots slowly develop.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Bookworm Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California
Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
May 8, 2020 10:40 AM CST
I've had the same one in a hanging basket for about 10 years now. It's just been in bloom the last couple of weeks. I take it out of it's basket every couple of years an root prune , put it back in same basket and add some fresh potting mix around the edges. It doesn't climb any more, but trails due to hard pruning years ago and root restrictions, and does bloom faithfully. I realize this is a totally different environment from yours, but the point is that it has nothing to do with repotting or pruning...they bloom in part sun and heat with proper feeding and watering.
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
Jun 9, 2020 1:10 PM CST
Results:

Of the stems i ground layered on 4/6 (and cut around 5/8 -5/15) 3 out of 6 have enough roots to come out of the terrarium. One is still green, but has no roots and 2 shriveled up and died.

Both green branches coming off nodes on old wood rooted.
Of 4 green strictly green branches only one rooted.
When i used a long tray and buried multiple consecutive nodes along a single branch only the node closest to the crown put down any roots.

Of 2 old wood w/green spouts i cut on 5/8 attempting to root covered inside a clear 2 litre bottle, one died one has a 2-3 very small roots

In short, next time, Ill stick to new sprouts starting from old wood and give myself an average of 6 weeks for viable rooted cuttings.
The plural of anecdote is not data.
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
Jun 9, 2020 1:16 PM CST
Results:

Of the stems i ground layered on 4/6 (and cut around 5/8 -5/15) 3 out of 6 have enough roots to come out of the terrarium. One is still green, but has no roots and 2 shriveled up and died.

Both green branches coming off nodes on old wood rooted.
Of 4 green strictly green branches only one rooted.
When i used a long tray and buried multiple consecutive nodes along a single branch only the node closest to the crown put down any roots.

Of 2 old wood w/green spouts i cut on 5/8 attempting to root covered inside a clear 2 litre bottle, one died one has a 2-3 very small roots

In short, next time, Ill stick to new sprouts starting from old wood and give myself an average of 6 weeks for viable rooted cuttings.

Next year ill try to start layering mid february so that by early April i can pot them up then transplant outdoors mid May. This year I just started too late. Of course I also found quart size plants 3 for $10 at lowes, so maybe I wont bring them in at all.
The plural of anecdote is not data.

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