Avatar for magpies
May 6, 2020 1:22 PM CST
UK
I have an area, about 1x9 meter. I want to put some plants down but before I even get started I get frustrated by the number of weeds growing, it is unmanageable. Big and small weeds, but the biggest pain is bindweed!!!

Anyway, I dug up the area and laid down some fresh soil from the local builder merchant, installed membrane underneath. Months later its turned into a nightmare as above.

I want to lay some plants and watch them grow with limited weed pulling, could you advise what I need to do…

Thanks all.
Avatar for WAMcCormick
May 6, 2020 6:05 PM CST
Bryan, TX
If you are wanting to set out plants, you can prep the bed, set out the plants, cut slots in cardboard and fit the cardboard around the plant stems leaving the plants above the cardboard, then put some mulch over the cardboard to hide it and keep it in place. The weeds can't get through the cardboard.

If you plan to plant seeds to start the plants, just get some good gloves and pull weeds as they come up.
If it takes a long time to grow, remember that if nobody plants it, nobody has it.
Avatar for magpies
May 7, 2020 3:46 AM CST
UK
Thank you for the reply, Bryan.

So in terms of soil – do I keep the stuff I already have down or do I need special soil for the plants to grow?

Great idea about the cardboard – assume over time this gets wet and the weeds will grow through again?
Avatar for WAMcCormick
May 7, 2020 10:36 AM CST
Bryan, TX
The cardboard should last a season. With a cardboard cover, it can be a little more difficult to get the soil watered evenly, but I think it is worth it. Newspaper works well too.
If it takes a long time to grow, remember that if nobody plants it, nobody has it.
Avatar for magpies
May 9, 2020 2:39 PM CST
UK
Thanks Again.

Bindweed, how do I kill this off, seems unstoppable and grows meters long?
Avatar for WAMcCormick
May 9, 2020 9:32 PM CST
Bryan, TX
I'm not familiar with bindweed, but for tenacious vines and runners, the way I would remove them at the outset would be to dig them out. Maybe someone who has experience with bindweed can chime in.
If it takes a long time to grow, remember that if nobody plants it, nobody has it.
Image
May 10, 2020 12:29 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
Bindweed is very difficult to remove by hand. It may take several seasons to totally remove. Unless you're organic, Round up would be recommended . After you spray, put down the cardboard, very thickly, and weigh it down by stones or bricks. Don't plant for a season. This should kill the rest of the weeds. Get rid of the membrane, whatever kind of material it is. These are pretty useless for inhibiting weeds and they inhibit garden plants growth.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for magpies
May 10, 2020 1:58 PM CST
UK
Thanks for the replies once again.

I will purchase some roundup tomorrow Smiling

The cardboard option is great, but is there a permanent solution, something more resilient for many seasons?
Image
May 10, 2020 2:07 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
The Round up is pretty much a permanent solution. But you may still get some more of it from time to time. You will just have to keep spraying and removing by hand.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Image
May 10, 2020 2:21 PM CST
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Bookworm Charter ATP Member Region: California Hummingbirder Orchids Plant Identifier
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
To clarify the use of Round-Up, don't cover until the weeds are dead. The systemic only works on ACTIVELY GROWING plants. If you cover before the plants are dead, you are cutting out light and air, killing the tops, but not necessarily the roots, and would just be wasting the chemical. What ever you decide to use, please read all the label carefully. Round-Up has come out with some new formulations since I retired and gave up my applicator's license, and I can't speak for those, so always read before you buy. If you can't get to the store, you can look them up on line before ordering.
Avatar for magpies
Jun 1, 2020 3:07 AM CST
UK
Thanks for the replies above. I took your advice and sprayed some round up. Pic attached. When should I pull them up?
Thumb of 2020-06-01/magpies/3e95e7
Image
Jun 1, 2020 4:00 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
I'm thinking when they shrivel up and look brown and dead.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for magpies
Jun 1, 2020 4:52 AM CST
UK
How do I know when the root is dead... think they about a meter long?
Image
Jun 7, 2020 12:43 PM CST
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Bookworm Charter ATP Member Region: California Hummingbirder Orchids Plant Identifier
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
When they turn brown and shrivel up you'll know they're dead.... not until then.
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