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Avatar for Coffeybean55
May 6, 2020 4:00 PM CST
Name: Dee Coffey
Orlando, Florida (Zone 9b)
Something had been eating my squash and cucumber leaves. When I went outside to check on my garden there was a huge grasshopper. Of course, I removed it. I have to believe it is the culprit. The leaves are pretty chewed up, should I cut them or prune them down and would it help if I covered it with netting?
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May 6, 2020 4:29 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
Welcome! I would remove the worst leaves, but not all at once to avoid further stress to the plants.They will most likely dry up if they're chewed really bad and then you can remove them. I'm thinking netting might work, if it's fine enough so the grasshoppers can't get through. The tomato plant has leaf miners, that's whats causing those little white tunnel looking things on the leaves. They are usually harmless to the plant, it's just cosmetic damage. This is the first time I've seen leaf miners on a tomato, I've previously only seen them on columbines.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for WAMcCormick
May 6, 2020 5:53 PM CST
Bryan, TX
If they were my plants, I would sprinkle a little Sevin dust on them while the dew is still on. Quick and simple solution whether it is grasshopper damage or some other culprit.
If it takes a long time to grow, remember that if nobody plants it, nobody has it.
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May 7, 2020 2:12 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
I'm sure Sevin Dust would work, but the problem with Sevin Dust is that it kills EVERY insect; the good as well as the bad. I never use it. Dee did not mention in her original post if she was organic or not, but if she is she will not want to use this product. Because she asking about using netting, I'm assuming she is looking for a safer way to protect her garden rather than using a dangerous chemical.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for Coffeybean55
May 7, 2020 5:14 AM CST
Name: Dee Coffey
Orlando, Florida (Zone 9b)
I use the Safer Product. I try to do things more organically. This is only my second year of growing my own garden. I tried last year but Florida was so hot last year in May everything died quickly. I have been reading and watching videos and did install the soaker hoses on timers this year. I appreciate all of your answers and I will install the netting today. As I am retired it is important to me to provide my husband and I safer and better vegetables to eat plus give me a task to keep me busy. Thank you so much! Smiling Smiling Thank You!
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May 7, 2020 7:13 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
Hurray! Dee! I thought you were organic. I've been organic for five years now. Safer for the bees, the animals, the people and the earth. Too many chemicals out there. We are still finding out how chemicals used years ago in the environment produced cancers and other diseases in us. Plus how long they poison our air, water and the land.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for Coffeybean55
May 7, 2020 7:26 AM CST
Name: Dee Coffey
Orlando, Florida (Zone 9b)
Lynda, I'd like to be more organic but it is expensive. I buy what I can and I thought the Safer brand name was more organic than Seven dust. I used to work for a chemical research company doing computer work and my own Primary Care Physician said, leave. I know chemicals are not good for the soil or people.
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May 7, 2020 7:29 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
It is expensive, but I find I don't have to spray many pests. Safer brand is very good, specially the insecticidal soap. The cost is not so bad if you don't broadcast spray, just spray the affected plants. Handpicking the insects is my first line of defense.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Avatar for WAMcCormick
May 7, 2020 10:48 AM CST
Bryan, TX
I have full respect for organic methods, but for me, I use compost and fertilizer from the feed store and occasionally a little Sevin.
If it takes a long time to grow, remember that if nobody plants it, nobody has it.
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May 7, 2020 4:19 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
Well, nothing wrong with compost and fertilizer, I use both.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
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