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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
May 7, 2020 5:13 AM CST
Im curious(again)...why many cacti genera dont have type species?
Name: Baja
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Baja_Costero
May 7, 2020 9:14 AM CST

Moderator

For example?
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
May 7, 2020 9:26 AM CST
Cereus for instance...ferocactus as well...opuntia too...then there is cylindropuntia...
I know that for mammillaria there mammillaria mammillaris... for astrophytum there is Astrophytum myriostigma..
and of course the monotypic genera(bergerocactus, carniegea, ortegocactus, obregonia, leuchtenbergia...
[Last edited by skopjecollection - May 7, 2020 9:28 AM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
May 7, 2020 10:00 AM CST

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There are sometimes long stories and multiple mistakes behind these decisions....

In the case of Ferocactus, the first example was published as Cactus recurvus (Miller, 1768) but the same plant was shortly thereafter published as C. nobilis (Linnaeus, 1771). Britton and Rose mistakenly specified C. nobilis as the type when they established Ferocactus in 1922. Unfortunately the original C. recurvus description is not clear and there is no type specimen, so that is not a valid type species either. In 1984 Taylor placed C. recurvus as a synonym of F. latispinus v. spiralis and proposed the type as F. wislizeni (originally described as an Echinocactus in 1848). As far as I know this is currently the type.

The name Cereus has a long history apparently going back to 1625. Britton and Rose mistakenly made C. peruvianus (Linnaeus, 1753) the lectotype in 1909. This cannot be valid because the basis was an illustration that was not cited by Miller when he described the name Cereus in 1754. Britton and Rose later made C. hexagonus the lectotype and this was accepted by Taylor in 1992.
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
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Willinator
May 7, 2020 10:10 AM CST
Wow, Now I might have to consider what cacti from all of these genera might
be dwarf species because I might try to grow them here in hot and humid Houston
TX in pots of course because we are in a rental house and I grow all of my plants in
pots. So no Saguaro cactus for me right now.
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
May 7, 2020 10:21 AM CST
Willinator said:Wow, Now I might have to consider what cacti from all of these genera might
be dwarf species because I might try to grow them here in hot and humid Houston
TX in pots of course because we are in a rental house and I grow all of my plants in
pots. So no Saguaro cactus for me right now.


...instead of going by genera...why dont you stick to dwarf and easy genera?
Im talking parodia, gymnocalycium, rebutia, mammillaria, astrophytum, and most echinopsis?
And maybe an eriosyce , matucana and coryphantha to spice it up? Echinocereus too?
Ferocacti and cerei and opuntias are okay...but you wont get much in terms of blooming for most of them..
[Last edited by skopjecollection - May 7, 2020 10:22 AM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
May 7, 2020 10:24 AM CST
Btw I am talking out of sheer experience here. I know having a giant cardoon can be all the rage...or a huge golden barrel...but getting a monthly rebutia and gymnocalycium bloom is more rewarding...
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
May 7, 2020 10:25 AM CST

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In the category of common and easy cacti, I would recommend this plant.

Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)
Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
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mcvansoest
May 7, 2020 10:59 AM CST
@Willinator

There are plenty of people growing cacti in the ground in that part of Texas, I realize that renting may make for another barrier against that, but to some extent that depends on your short/long term outlook in terms of living where you are and how your landlord/lady feels about you doing stuff to the yard - I just bought a house after living in the same rental for over 10 years. At the rental place I think I can honestly say that I turned the standard xeriscaped front yard into a fun great looking cactus, agave and aloe garden that added significant value to the price of the property even after I moved and took about 80% or so of the plants with me.

I started collecting in pots but when you live in a place where things can thrive in the ground, in my experience it is really difficult to resist getting larger growing things that need to be in the ground to thrive. Houston has the issue of humidity, but with some planning and being somewhat selective you can find quite a few species that actually will do quite well there. The project would be amending the soil to become more fast draining and/or creating raised bed that are the same, maybe too much for living in a rental. In my case here in Phoenix area I could just plop things in the ground, the main worry being the presence of some shade.

By the time we left that place there was some stuff there that was too large to move. So we left it, I only moved about 3 miles from where I used to be, so I did drive by the old place a few times, mainly to watch a flowering Agave and yes to make sure there was no wholesale raising of the yard going on. Aside from severely pruning some large Prickly Pears things looked good the last time I drove by, the new renters clearly were at least keeping up with watering. Having to leave some of the stuff was hard, but when plants are that big and mature their re-adjustment time after being moved becomes very long with a large chance of failure and it would have required professionals with a crane. So I am at piece with it now.

However, if that is something that you cannot do - because of landlord reasons or just reluctance to commit to maybe having to leave plants behind - I would probably not get plants that just will not thrive long term in pots. As Stefan lists there are plenty of cacti out there that will do just fine in pots, and it is not impossible to get some growing pleasure out of some larger growing cacti like Ferocacti or a Golden Barrel that take such a long time to get there that keeping them in a pot for years is no issue. Getting those to flower in pots is hard, but not impossible.
It is what it is!
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
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Willinator
May 7, 2020 11:09 AM CST
Well, I would love it to find cacti that will bloom regularly
That would be very worthwhile growing them in pots.
So, should I be looking at Rebutia and Gymnocalcycium
as potential frequent bloomers?
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 7, 2020 11:16 AM CST
Ugh. Names again. Today on Facebook a photo of Homalocephala texensis with the common name of Horse Crippler was posted. It looks the same as the one I know as Echinocactus texensis also called Horse Crippler as a common name. I asked. Was told they are the same. I asked about whether the names changed. The response was that H. texensis was the orginal moniker but was changed to E. texensis. But they believe it has now been changed back to Homalocephala texensis, but not definite. The database doesn't list H. texensis as a synonym. Either way, my natives recently put in a civilized container are showing new growth :).
Thumb of 2020-05-07/needrain/d82a66

Donald
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
May 7, 2020 11:20 AM CST

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Homalocephala was split from Echinocactus in 2018:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/p...

The CoL and our database have not yet caught up with the change.
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
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skopjecollection
May 7, 2020 11:22 AM CST
Willinator said:Well, I would love it to find cacti that will bloom regularly
That would be very worthwhile growing them in pots.
So, should I be looking at Rebutia and Gymnocalcycium
as potential frequent bloomers?

Mammillaria is a frequent bloomer. Those 2 are seasonal...
For instance...this rebutia..

Thumb of 2020-05-07/skopjecollection/5085ea
Has let out about 7 blooms so far, and 2 are in waiting,,,
The plant is tiny, slow growing, but easy to move and handle
there is also these rebutias









The magenta one has 2 seasons(april and sometime in the summer) .
The other 2 have a shorter one...
Now the gymnocaylciums...






One blooms in june i think, the other i july.
They tend to have multiple buds ..either going all at once, or with a delay(start of june and early july...
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 7, 2020 11:23 AM CST
Baja_Costero said:Homalocephala was split from Echinocactus in 2018:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/p...

The CoL and our database have not yet caught up with the change.


So my native is Homalocephala texensis? I have to learn a new name? Blinking
Donald
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
May 7, 2020 11:23 AM CST

Moderator

I'm not going to complain if you keep using the old one. Smiling
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
May 7, 2020 11:28 AM CST

Moderator

For what it's worth, Echinocactus grusonii was also recently renamed, as Kroenleinia grusonii, in 2014 (though the cactus people have yet to adopt the new name). Genetically that one is an outlier from the rest of the group.
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
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skopjecollection
May 7, 2020 11:32 AM CST
The ones...easiest to get to bloom are mammillarias...


Thumb of 2020-05-07/skopjecollection/b0102d


(this first one died for the most part, barely saved a piece)..





Thumb of 2020-05-07/skopjecollection/6f86fa

but for the most part ..the flowers are tiny(heyderii for instance should have decent size, same goes for another i own(but hadnt bloomed) called longimamma)..so it needs effort...
One i had(at one point..same species not cultivar)


And others ive seen




Thumb of 2020-05-07/skopjecollection/7af18c

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