Mid Atlantic Gardening forum→Raspberries and Cilantro

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Crofton, MD
acamela
May 8, 2020 11:26 AM CST
I planted some raspberry bushes about a week ago. I also planted some Cilantro at the same time. A couple of my raspberry bushes are doing ok (I bought 9 bushes and 3 canes). However, the raspberry bushes attached are not too happy. I planted cilantro around the same time, and that is looking like a loss too.

Does anybody have an tips or tricks to help these guys. I admittedly am not a green thumb by any means, but I'm trying to learn. I figure it's something constructive to do during quarantine, and my kids love berries ;) I don't have a picture of the cilantro right now, but it is getting brown and deal stalks/leaves.


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[Last edited by acamela - May 8, 2020 11:27 AM (+)]
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Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
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critterologist
May 8, 2020 1:47 PM CST
First, Welcome!

I'm excited that you and others are trying out gardening during this time. Don't be discouraged if everything doesn't flourish the first time around! We all learn by trial and error -- and by asking questions.

Our nights have mostly been pretty cool yet, so I think it's too early to put cilantro plants into the ground. With the soil being both wet and cold, they'll have trouble. If you can, dig them up and put them in a pot (an empty plastic container will work, just poke some holes in the bottom for drainage), then bring them inside -- they'll definitely die in the forecasted cold weather tonight and Saturday night. Cilantro, basil, peppers are "warm season" plants, and around here (I'm in Frederick, MD), Memorial Day is a good time to put them into the ground.

The raspberry in your photo looks like it's been planted pretty deep... when you put in a potted plant, you usually want to plant it at the same depth it has been growing (so the soil surface in the pot is even with the level of the surrounding soil). With the bare root canes, plant them so the roots are all beneath ground level, but don't bury them deeper than that.

Higher than the surrounding ground is often good, especially for plants that need good drainage or, in other words, hate wet feet (1/3 of the rootball above ground level, so the plant is on a little mound when you're done).

A few plants, like clematis and roses and tomatoes, should be planted deeper (just to confuse things LOL).

Often, though, if you bury the "crown" of the plant (the central part where stems and branches originate), the center can rot out or just not grow properly.

We've been having really wet weather, and new plants can sometimes have trouble soaking up enough of the water around their roots so they don't drown. I think that's what you're seeing with those yellowing leaves -- too much water. I would go out and dig them up, put them back into their pots (if you kept them) in a sheltered location (like up against the house) until they recover and start putting out new leaves. If you can't do that, try to lift them (with a shovel) as much above the ground as you can -- like, dig them halfway up and then put some dirt around them so the roots aren't exposed.

That looks like wonderful, compost-rich soil you're planting into! Did you make a raised bed, or how did you get your planting area ready?

I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
Crofton, MD
acamela
May 8, 2020 7:14 PM CST
Thank you for your reply. We are in Crofton, MD, so we are pretty close to each other. I hear what you are saying about the rain lately. I have some planters that I will get them into this weekend. I planted raspberries and strawberries up against the house, and they are looking great.

As far as the beds I think you could call them a raised bed. I dug up the sod that was down, tried to dig up some of the dirt underneath the sod, and then filled with about 8-10 inches of garden soil. I made at least 5 trips back to the garden center to acquire more garden soil ;)

Thank you again for your reply. I really appreciate it.
Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
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critterologist
May 8, 2020 8:08 PM CST
I think they'll recover quickly once they get a chance to dry out a little. (Not that they want to get bone-dry, but you know what I mean.) If the roots look good, don't worry too much about the leaves -- new ones will grow.

Your new beds sound great! You mentioned digging up sod... new house? Dealing with the compacted clay a new build leaves is such a challenge! When we moved in, I marked out areas where I wanted garden instead of lawn, and we had literally dumptruck-loads of compost tilled in.

I hope your raspberry bed will be the start of something fun for your family! There's nothing like picking your own fresh raspberries... and given the cost of raspberries in the store, definitely something that's worth trying to grow in your own yard. I'm thinking that the first year the raspberry plants are in the ground, you might have space in between them to put a tomato plant, or even just a few beans or something. If the kids like cherry tomatoes, pick up a 'Sweet Million' or 'Sun Sugar' or a grape variety... Cherry tomatoes produce like crazy all summer. Try some containers, too, especially if you have a back deck or patio... Herbs that you grow right by the back door are easy to grab for supper and easy to keep an eye on to make sure they get watered (not a problem this month!).

One thing I wish I'd done when I put in my raspberries is to put in some support for them. You might want to think about adding something next week, while the plants are out of the ground recovering. Check out this article My raspberries have become almost entirely overgrown, to the point where I think I'm going to try to pot up the survivors and solarize the bed to get rid of the weeds. It'll probably become a veggie bed with raspberries elsewhere, but I'm for sure going to put in a support system this time.

Drop by the "Yardening" thread to see what other gardeners in our area are doing!
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
[Last edited by Abigail - May 17, 2021 2:43 PM (+)]
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Crofton, MD
acamela
May 8, 2020 8:44 PM CST
I have cages for all the raspberries. I'ts an older home, i planted sod this summer and spent hours the past week digging it up Smiling I put a couple more beds on the other side of the yard with 4 raspberries, 4 strawberry bushes (they are all looking great), 6 cherry tomatoes, 3 larger tomatoes, a few peppers, some eggplant, thyme/rosmary/basil, I think thats it. Oh we planted a watermelon too, and some seeds from a butternut squash we cooked (they are actually sprouting).

I went out tonight and covered all my babies. It's pretty exciting seeing all this come to fruition. All those raised beds I made with stuff sitting around the house. Old 2x6's, bunch of flat rocks the old owners had around some old beds, etc...

All that was free, the damn dirt was not though :(
[Last edited by acamela - May 8, 2020 9:08 PM (+)]
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Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
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critterologist
May 9, 2020 7:14 AM CST
Wonderful!

I'm glad you covered things last night... do it again tonight!

The peppers, eggplant, basil, watermelon, and squash might struggle until the soil temp rises (eg, night temps need to get warmer). You can help them! Black plastic along the row will warm the soil (garbage bags work fine), but it'll also keep the soil from drying out, so watch out for yellowing leaves and take up the plastic if needed so the soil can dry. Or put milk jugs, water bottles, water buckets, etc along the rows. They will soak up warmth during the day and release it around the plant at night. Rocks work that way, too, as "heat sinks." Or you could put the plants "to bed" at night and cover them. If easier, it's totally OK to cover the tomatoes and raspberries at night also.

If you need good soil in quantity again, think about getting it by the cubic yard instead of in bags. I use Bussard Bros, but there are other places around that will deliver a nice pile for you. BB will also mix in leafgro or compost for you. You can probably borrow a wheelbarrow from a neighbor. I've started getting bagged mulch because I just can't do the shoveling any more, but it's a whole lot cheaper by the yard -- $22 or so for 27 cubic feet, delivered, min. 2 yards.
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
Crofton, MD
acamela
May 9, 2020 12:00 PM CST
Those are all good points. We are gonna go out and do the black plastic bags for the next few days until it warms up, the soil is till a little damn from all this sill rain. I will make sure it is dry before we lay the bags out. I also want to make sure my raspberries are not covered in too much soil. I know the package said they needed sandy soil, maybe I will mix a bit in with them?

I called about 6 places trying to get the proper soil delivered, every place I called didn't have delivery until mid May. I guess a lot of people have the same idea I had. I got some planters coming tomorrow for my cilantro. I don't have a spot that gets good sun inside that is convenient. I am going to get creative. We have 3 small kids, so I can't have them on the ground inside where small hands can get into them. I will improvise though and make a spot.
Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
We're all learners, doers, teachers
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critterologist
May 9, 2020 1:43 PM CST
hanging baskets?

"sandy soil" = "good drainage" (doesn't have to be sand, which is very heavy to work with)

My raspberries did fine in clay amended with compost. They only need help now because I neglected the bed too much and let it get overrun with perennial weeds.

For anything needing good drainage, I always try to elevate the rootball when I plant, so about 1/3 is above the level of the surrounding soil. Potted plants usually come out with their roots and potting mix in the shape of the pot... you don't want to end up with the "edges" exposed, but just mound dirt up to meet the top of the rootball after putting it in the hole.
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
May 10, 2020 7:24 PM CST
Hi,
I've tried cilantro a few times with little luck. It likes cool weather.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
We're all learners, doers, teachers
Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Critters Allowed Butterflies Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Bee Lover Region: Mid-Atlantic Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Tropicals Hibiscus
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critterologist
May 10, 2020 7:33 PM CST
Thanks for your input, Sally. I thought it was more like basil... but to be honest, cilantro tastes like soap to me, so I've never tried growing it.
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
Name: Susan
Potomac, MD (Zone 7a)
Herbs Peonies Region: Maryland Vegetable Grower Composter
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sulurph
May 12, 2020 9:31 AM CST
I use cilantro a lot in cooking and like Sally, have tried growing a few times, but it always bolts when the weather gets hot. Has anyone had luck growing it indoors?
When the world wearies and society ceases to satisfy, there is always the GARDEN
Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
We're all learners, doers, teachers
Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Critters Allowed Butterflies Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Bee Lover Region: Mid-Atlantic Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Tropicals Hibiscus
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critterologist
May 12, 2020 10:59 AM CST
herbs will do ok on a windowsill but often end up weak and leggy --there's just not enough light coming through the glass

try under a light if possible... just a cool fluorescent tube would work, leaves as close to the light as you can manage
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
Image
sallyg
May 12, 2020 3:42 PM CST
Ha
https://aggie-horticulture.tam...

My cilantro under lights, I think I have figured out it is spider mite magnet. Starts out then gets pale and weak. Yet somebody grows it by acres, lol.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
[Last edited by sallyg - May 12, 2020 3:44 PM (+)]
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Name: Lisa Olson
Washington DC (Zone 7a)
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5601Lisa
May 12, 2020 5:52 PM CST
Fine Cooking Mag from April '95 says herb name is "fresh coriander," not "cilantro." Yep spending time culling through cooking mags.



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Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
We're all learners, doers, teachers
Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Critters Allowed Butterflies Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Bee Lover Region: Mid-Atlantic Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Tropicals Hibiscus
Image
critterologist
May 13, 2020 1:30 PM CST
If you're using it in Mexican cooking, it's cilantro! I don't think they let it go to seed at all.
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.

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