Ask a Question forum→Smaller mounding perennial shrub?

Views: 112, Replies: 1 » Jump to the end
Name: Matt B
Perrysburg, OH (Zone 6a)
Image
Titanhockey02
May 9, 2020 7:36 AM CST
Hi everyone, I live in 43551 zip code. My wife and I are redoing some of our backyard landscaping. Our house faces the west so we get full morning sun on our backyard. I attached a few pictures of a chunk of the area we are replanting. Right now, we have pink cherry trees at both corners of our patio. We bought some floralberry sangria st John's wart to go in the straight areas, and spirea to go by the cherry trees (between the patio and the tree). We are looking for some smaller (like 24-30"max round and high... Could even be smaller than that) shrubs to put on the outside of the cherry trees. Last year, when we built our house, I had envisioned all of these flowers planted in these spaces but couldn't pull off the look. We realize now, mid may, with nothing substantial back there that we would like more shrubs so it doesn't look so bare in winter and spring. Ideally the shrub would be a flowering one at some point of the year and/or interesting leaves. I attached pictures of the spirea and st John's wart to get an idea of the colors that will be planted back there. We had considered hosta around the trees (thinking since it's morning to early afternoon sun, they'd probably be ok) but that goes back to not having anything growing there until the leaves pop up this time of year. We already have bobo hydrangeas and some Judi viburnums in our yard as well as dwarf rhododendron and dwarf lilacs so trying to think of something other than those.

Thanks!
Thumb of 2020-05-09/Titanhockey02/be982c
Thumb of 2020-05-09/Titanhockey02/b58ad4
Thumb of 2020-05-09/Titanhockey02/c2d638

Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Quitter's never Win
Hummingbirder Birds Organic Gardener Dog Lover Cat Lover
oneeyeluke
May 10, 2020 1:17 AM CST
If you're going to spend a lot on plants and landscape, I recommend you get a soil test at the local university to find what kind of pH, CEC, NPK and trace nutrients you have to work with. A soil test will run you about $30 us dollars. With a soil test you can match the plants with the soil and feed the soil with what it needs, instead of what you can get.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "clematis"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.