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Avatar for dbanks314
May 9, 2020 10:26 AM CST
st louis mo
I have read alot about removing leaves from tomatoes plants, my concern is that they are yet young and about 5 inches in height, should I remove the leaves to promote growth?
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May 9, 2020 10:29 AM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Welcome!

Leaves (and photosynthesis) are the only means plants have to feed themselves. Removing leaves seems very counter-intuitive.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
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Avatar for SoulReaver009
May 9, 2020 3:34 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
Post a pic. And yes removing leaves, or clipping them in half triggers the plant to grow more. It is about how you do it, and if the plant is big enough yet, to do it. Like daisy said, clipping them is taking away their food production. If it has 2 leaves, and you clip one, you take away HALF of its food production. If it has 4 leaves and you clip one, you take away a quarter of its future food production. And so on...

Some people do it, and some don't. If it's your only tomato plant, why risk it?
Avatar for NewbieGardner
May 9, 2020 5:23 PM CST
Seattle, WA (Zone 8b)
There are some sucker leaves which grows between two branches. So if you don't remove these leaves it inhibits the overall growth of tomato plant and the yield also reduces. All the nutrients needed for the plant is sucked by those leaves for their growth.
So as and when when you see new growth in between the main branches you have to remove it by pinching it. It helps to keep your plant healthy and get more yield.
Last edited by NewbieGardner May 9, 2020 5:23 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for SoulReaver009
May 9, 2020 5:42 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
Really? Thanks for posting that newbie. I will have to lookout for that, in the future.

Would you happen to have a pic of that? So I can see.
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May 9, 2020 6:28 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
The leaf/root relationship is not a complicated one. There are enough roots to support the leaves and there are enough leaves to support the roots. Together they grow and the plant gets larger. If you remove leaves, new leaves will quickly grow to replace the lost leaves. Then, when all is in balance again, the plant will start to grow. Thinking you are causing more growth by taking off leaves is just an illusion.

I have taken the suckers out and I have left them in. The only difference I can see is if I remove the suckers, have a taller plant. And although I got tomatoes earlier by removing suckers, I got fewer tomatoes overall. The time difference is not great enough to encourage me to spend my summer trying to remove tomato suckers.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for SoulReaver009
May 9, 2020 9:36 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
Thank you daisy.
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May 9, 2020 9:40 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
You're welcome SR
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
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May 10, 2020 12:06 AM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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Removing leaves from the BOTTOM of mature tomato plants can be very helpful if you live where tomato diseases are prevalent. Note, this is done on mature plants. Removing the leaves on the bottom foot of the plant lessens the chance of water splashing soil borne diseases getting onto the leaves. This is a method done in in the South.I do this myself.
RE suckers, I'm with Daisy, I've done it, not done it, I think it's a personal decision. Depends on how you stake/trellis them. If you stick to a severe staking system, taking out suckers is preferred.
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Avatar for dbanks314
May 10, 2020 1:30 PM CST
st louis mo
Thanks here is images
Avatar for dbanks314
May 10, 2020 1:43 PM CST
st louis mo
Would love to upload a image but the add a image is not working on my iPhone 8 maybe I don't know what I'm doing
Avatar for NewbieGardner
May 10, 2020 7:08 PM CST
Seattle, WA (Zone 8b)
Hello Soulreaver009,
Unfortunately I don't have any pictures at the moment.
Avatar for SoulReaver009
May 10, 2020 7:28 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
It's ok. I have 4 better boy tomato sprouts. I'm sure one will have it. And I will post a question when it happens.

I don't want to hijack this thread. Thank you all. I know I'm not the OP (original poster), but it was informative reading this article. I will not be hijacking this thread, so it's back to the OP.
Avatar for dbanks314
May 11, 2020 1:23 PM CST
st louis mo
DaisyI said: Welcome! thank you Im still learning how to work this site.


Leaves (and photosynthesis) are the only means plants have to feed themselves. Removing leaves seems very counter-intuitive.
Avatar for dbanks314
May 11, 2020 1:25 PM CST
st louis mo
SoulReaver009 said: thank you for your responce. i would love to post a pic but when i click upload image nothing happens. I am still learning how to work this site. thanks again
Post a pic. And yes removing leaves, or clipping them in half triggers the plant to grow more. It is about how you do it, and if the plant is big enough yet, to do it. Like daisy said, clipping them is taking away their food production. If it has 2 leaves, and you clip one, you take away HALF of its food production. If it has 4 leaves and you clip one, you take away a quarter of its future food production. And so on...

Some people do it, and some don't. If it's your only tomato plant, why risk it?
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