Avatar for Cornfreaky
May 9, 2020 10:59 PM CST
Northern CT
hi

Wee have a slight slope facing west. Was wondering what type of plants will do well on its natural slope without major change. The fence gate is level. The bottom of it gives you an idea of the slope.




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May 10, 2020 1:27 AM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
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I think anything goes. It looks very minor.
Plant it and they will come.
Avatar for Cornfreaky
May 10, 2020 7:26 AM CST
Northern CT
sallyg said:I think anything goes. It looks very minor.


Great to hear! Plant rows North to South, or same way as slope? Hmmm Thinking
Last edited by Cornfreaky May 10, 2020 7:27 AM Icon for preview
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May 10, 2020 8:14 AM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
Hm. I lean to rows across the slope for water holding, but try to put tall things on the north side of short things. If you can do both Shrug!
Plant it and they will come.
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May 10, 2020 8:28 AM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
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I agree, the slope is a minor issue.

But I agree that on any slope, you should plant across the slope. In the long run it does cut down on potential run off. And don't get me wrong, where you are in CT, your run off will most likely be from intense thundershowers. Connecticut does not suffer from monsoons! Rolling on the floor laughing Those babies can have incredible 'rainfall rates' so planting perpendicular to the slope can help ease that concern.
I think that you can pretty much do what you want.
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
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