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Avatar for CErekson
May 10, 2020 3:01 PM CST
Oregon
I have lavender (light purple) rhododendrons. If I raise the acidity of the soil, will they change color ... a deeper purple or pink/reddish?
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May 10, 2020 4:16 PM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
GROW ORCHIDS!!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
No.
They are not like hydrangeas.
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
Avatar for luis_pr
May 10, 2020 8:34 PM CST
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Azaleas Salvias Roses Plumerias Region: New Hampshire Hydrangeas
Hibiscus Region: Georgia Region: Florida Dog Lover Region: Texas
In general, they do not react to soil pH. But this is an interesting subject because:

Some have blooms that darken as the bloom gets "older" like roses do.

If the plant were to be grafted (rare in the U.S.), the rootstock may produce a different color and form of bloom than the top (if the top were to die).

Sports can develop on a branch but not on a complete shrub all of the sudden.

Some small variation in color may occur in sandy soils due to mineral deficiencies.

Some revert back to their parents. To one degree or another. Azalea George L. Taber occasionally throws out a solid purple-flowered branch... because that is where it originated... as a sport. Bi-color Encore Azalea Autumn Twist, which has some flecks- will occasionally throw full white or full purple blooms..
Last edited by luis_pr May 11, 2020 2:00 AM Icon for preview
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