Ask a Question forum→Tulip Bulbs Look Strange ?

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Wales UK
Region: Wales
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Tafy
May 11, 2020 11:24 AM CST
Hi All
I was removing my Tulip bulbs out of pots today and strange thing they look deformed ?
It's looks as if the root was trying to grow half way up the stem ?
Can anyone tell me whats wrong whith these Tulip bulbs Please ?
Not all look like this only a few they were planted in pots and none of them flowered either.
I'm thinking either I didn't plant them deep enough or pots were overcrowded
I planted these bulbs last Oct-Nov and as I said none flowered out of 20-30 bulbs.
any help ideas or opinions would be appreciated so I don't make this mistake again.

Thumb of 2020-05-11/Tafy/438a71

cheers
Tafy


Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
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oneeyeluke
May 12, 2020 5:29 AM CST
They were planted too deep, most of the bulb energy went to stem growth trying to reach the top.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
Name: Rick R.
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Leftwood
May 12, 2020 6:58 AM CST
Actually it is just the opposite! See how the old bulb (with the roots and last year's dried bulb sheath) is above and the new bulb is below. The new bulb will not grow roots until fall time.

Tulips, like all plants, have a preferred depth to grow at. Even for the same species, this depth can vary depending on the type of soil and climate. For instance, a tulip growing in a sandy soil would likely want to be deeper than one in a clay soil. Most bulbs that need be deep in the soil to be happy, have developed ways to to alter their position in the soil to suit their needs. You have discovered one of the ways! Thumbs up

You are exactly right: the tulip plants growing in the pot were planted to shallowly, and the bulbs decided to plant themselves deeper. Unlike some kinds of bulbs, tulips grow a new bulb every year, and exhaust the old one. If the bulbs were already at the correct depth, the tulips would have produced a new bulb at the same depth as the old bulb. But in your case, the plants decided to reach down and find a new deeper home for the new bulb to grow.

Your bulbs were, and probably still are, too small to produce a flower. Hybrid tulips are often hard to grow well enough to keep flowering, let alone grow them to flowering from a small bulb. This is because it is hard to duplicate they environmental needs outside of their native homes. Species tulips are much easier in this regard.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Wales UK
Region: Wales
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Tafy
May 13, 2020 7:19 AM CST
Leftwood said:
Most bulbs that need be deep in the soil to be happy, have developed ways to to alter their position in the soil to suit their needs. You have discovered one of the ways!

You are exactly right: the tulip plants growing in the pot were planted to shallowly, and the bulbs decided to plant themselves deeper.
But in your case, the plants decided to reach down and find a new deeper home for the new bulb to grow.


Thank You Rick for your Concise and quite detailed answer......... so now I know D'Oh!
I won't make this mistake again in the fall.
cheers
Tafy

[Last edited by Tafy - May 14, 2020 1:12 PM (+)]
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