Ask a Question forum→Dying palm tree

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British Columbia
emjayyy
May 12, 2020 11:13 AM CST
Hi everyone about six months ago I bought a majesty palm tree, which I know isn't great to keep indoors, but I didn't know it back then. Up until about a month ago it's been going amazingly, I had it in a nice sunny spot and it was putting out a new grind every month. However, I had to repost it yesterday, and I found the starting of root rot. I cut off all the infected parts, washed it, and then potted it in new soil. Then, I left it outside to get some extra sun. I may have forgotten about it until it was around 10, and by then the temperature had dropped to 2, and one of the fronds is drooping and feels almost squishy. I'm not sure if it's from the shock of moving pots or the temperature, but I'm not sure how to fix it :/
Thumb of 2020-05-12/emjayyy/44db77

Edit: I should clarify that I meant 2 degrees Celsius, not Fahrenheit.
[Last edited by emjayyy - May 12, 2020 6:22 PM (+)]
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 12, 2020 3:51 PM CST
Amazing that it is still alive after all that. Keep it outside as long as temps are above 50 degrees F. Cut off any dying fronds.

Replacing soil is never a good idea and does serious damage to roots.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
British Columbia
emjayyy
May 12, 2020 4:25 PM CST
Thank you for answering!
So I should cut off the "squishy" frond and leave the rest?
Also, I'm sorry if this isn't a great question, but why is replacing soil bad for the roots? My thought process was that I waned the healthy roots in different soil then the one that had the rooting roots in it, but that could be completely wrong Hilarious!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 13, 2020 7:29 AM CST
Yes, remove the dying portion and leave the rest.

Your questions is a good one. It is a common misunderstanding that nursery growers use poor quality soil to grow their plants. Because they need to grow healthy plants quickly to stay in business the soi they use is usually appropriate. In addition, plant roots adapt to what they are grown in.

Replacing soil tears away the tiny root hairs that go unnoticed but do most of the work. The plant then has to grow new root hairs that are adapted to whatever potting mix you believe is superior. That is a lot of unnecessary stress to put a plant through.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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