Image
May 12, 2020 7:02 PM CST
British Columbia, Canada (Zone 9a)
Hello,

This aloe and another both created what I have heard called aerial off-sets (off-set on the flower stem). This particular one formed many months ago. I keep hoping it will start to make some aerial roots, but so far no such luck. It looks like when it gets the size I want I will have to remove it and root it. I assume rooting it is no different than rooting an aloe without roots. Just gently/ slightly into the rooting medium. Leave for one month in bright location, out of direct sunlight. Check to see if there are any roots if there are, slowly increase the amount of water as the roots grow. If it is not rooted yet, check back in two weeks. I have had success doing this in the past. The plant can be quite withered by the time it roots, but it is a successful techique in those instances. Should I do anything different with this one? (I also have another aloe with two aerial off-sets on it.)

This is one has been on the parent plant long enough to have bloomed itself. I love that it is very different looking than the parent plant or any of the root offsets. Those looks exactly like mama, but this one is extremely bumpy and dramatic. I don't want to get it wrong. I really like it.

I plan to continue to leave it on the parent plant as long as possible. I want a nice large plant to root, so it has something to work with when it comes to rooting. I am sure it will root now, but I am in no rush.

Thumb of 2020-05-13/cullen_/f06be5

Thumb of 2020-05-13/cullen_/1ca88c


Thumb of 2020-05-13/cullen_/939b59
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May 12, 2020 8:21 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers
Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Garden Ideas: Level 1
Your plant is getting excellent light. Thumbs up

Yes, that there is a bulbil and it's ripe for harvest. In my experience they don't root on the stalk, but they do root relatively quickly once removed. Get some fine (nail) scissors and cut the inflorescence below the bulbil. Then trim back the ends of the peduncle to near the base. I would plant in a 4 inch azalea pot, on top of the soil, and water like normal. Once I see growth I up the pot size. Starting small allows me to water like my other plants so I can forget about the situation for a while.

I had a bulbil on this plant (Christmas Carol) that flowered (like yours did) and left a secondary bulbil on the stalk above it. Pretty crazy stuff.
Last edited by Baja_Costero May 12, 2020 8:24 PM Icon for preview
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May 12, 2020 8:41 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
Region: Arizona Enjoys or suffers hot summers Cactus and Succulents Xeriscape Adeniums Hybridizer
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My Gasteraloe 'Green Ice' does this all the time - I think this year is the first time that it bloomed that it did not do this. I left some long enough on the flower stalk that the plant itself has almost caught up with it in terms of regular offsets so there are a few that in not too much time you might not even be able to notice that they are bulbils on the flower stalk. I have another few that are really small still.

I took one off the plant and stuck it in a random pot, did not think about it for 2 weeks and it had roots...

The main thing is to not take the bulbils too early, yours looks, like Baja says, like prime size for rooting.

Have you exposed your plant to brighter sunlight or more sunlight than previously? Both the bulbil and new growth on the main plant look way more bumpy, which in my experience is usually a response to 'harsher' conditions. Ie. more sun, a little less water etc...
It is what it is!
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May 12, 2020 8:41 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers
Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Garden Ideas: Level 1
The bulbils are extra bumpy on this plant.
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May 12, 2020 8:46 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
Region: Arizona Enjoys or suffers hot summers Cactus and Succulents Xeriscape Adeniums Hybridizer
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It is what it is!
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May 12, 2020 9:53 PM CST
Name: Eric
Wisconsin (Zone 4b)
Cactus and Succulents Plant and/or Seed Trader
cullen_ said:Hello,

This aloe and another both created what I have heard called aerial off-sets (off-set on the flower stem). This particular one formed many months ago. I keep hoping it will start to make some aerial roots, but so far no such luck. It looks like when it gets the size I want I will have to remove it and root it. I assume rooting it is no different than rooting an aloe without roots. Just gently/ slightly into the rooting medium. Leave for one month in bright location, out of direct sunlight. Check to see if there are any roots if there are, slowly increase the amount of water as the roots grow. If it is not rooted yet, check back in two weeks. I have had success doing this in the past. The plant can be quite withered by the time it roots, but it is a successful techique in those instances. Should I do anything different with this one? (I also have another aloe with two aerial off-sets on it.)

This is one has been on the parent plant long enough to have bloomed itself. I love that it is very different looking than the parent plant or any of the root offsets. Those looks exactly like mama, but this one is extremely bumpy and dramatic. I don't want to get it wrong. I really like it.

I plan to continue to leave it on the parent plant as long as possible. I want a nice large plant to root, so it has something to work with when it comes to rooting. I am sure it will root now, but I am in no rush.

Thumb of 2020-05-13/cullen_/f06be5

Thumb of 2020-05-13/cullen_/1ca88c


Thumb of 2020-05-13/cullen_/939b59



I hope mine does this. That's awesome!! Drooling Drooling
Image
May 14, 2020 2:43 AM CST
British Columbia, Canada (Zone 9a)
Thank you all for your help. I will remove it sooner than later. The one thing I will do different is the pot size. I will start smaller. 2.5" pot. The parent plant is only in a 4.5" pot. I also have to think about space. I recently potted up most of my baby aloe plants and still need to pot up a few more. A 4" pot would take up way too much room at this point. All spring sales and summer markets have been cancelled, so I have very little chance of getting rid of all these babies. Our club probably won't meet again until fall at the earliest, so I can't even give them away. The longer I keep them the more attached I will get. This is not a good thing.
I pollinated a bunch of aloes over the winter. These are better breeding than my first effort, so I am really want to get some planted.
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