Plant ID forum→Can you help me ID this plant?

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Canada
MikyPiky
May 13, 2020 11:51 AM CST
We moved to a new house recently and this started coming up in the flower beds. I'm really curious as to what it is, any help is appreciated!
Thumb of 2020-05-13/MikyPiky/beb864

Name: Debbie
Manitoba, Canada (Zone 3a)
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DebbieC
May 13, 2020 1:02 PM CST
Welcome! They are Lilies.
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
May 13, 2020 1:23 PM CST
I agree, some type of Lilies (Lilium)
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Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
May 13, 2020 2:45 PM CST
Maybe dwarf Asiatic lilies because at this stage they don't look like they will shoot up to be tall. They may have started from one bulb then multiplied. You can carefully dig and separate after the foliage dies back in the autumn.

How about posting photos on the Lily Forum here when they start blooming? I'm curious to see what they look like.
Canada
MikyPiky
May 13, 2020 3:10 PM CST
pardalinum said:Maybe dwarf Asiatic lilies because at this stage they don't look like they will shoot up to be tall. They may have started from one bulb then multiplied. You can carefully dig and separate after the foliage dies back in the autumn.

How about posting photos on the Lily Forum here when they start blooming? I'm curious to see what they look like.


If they are dwarf Asiatic lilies I'm very excited! I searched them and they look absolutely beautiful.

I will try to remember to post a picture of them when they bloom for you! Smiling
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
May 13, 2020 4:45 PM CST
Here are links to some Dwarf Asiatic Lilies in our database: https://garden.org/plants/sear...
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Canada
MikyPiky
Jun 29, 2020 5:31 PM CST
MikyPiky said:

If they are dwarf Asiatic lilies I'm very excited! I searched them and they look absolutely beautiful.

I will try to remember to post a picture of them when they bloom for you! Smiling

They finally bloomed! I have some pictures of them, they are absolutely stunning! Also they are a lot taller than the last time I showed you, they probably aren't the dwarf kind. Why are there two completely different kinds of lily in one plant?

Thumb of 2020-06-29/MikyPiky/f8fb3f




Thumb of 2020-06-29/MikyPiky/307068

Name: Mone
Chicago *O'Hare/Lake* (Zone 6a)
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pitimpinai
Jun 29, 2020 5:42 PM CST
Those are Asiatic lilies.
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jun 29, 2020 6:09 PM CST
Dwarf Asiatic lilies. I can see that they are short. I don't see two different blooms on one plant. Blooms do slowly fade over several days.
Canada
MikyPiky
Jun 30, 2020 12:16 PM CST
pardalinum said:Dwarf Asiatic lilies. I can see that they are short. I don't see two different blooms on one plant. Blooms do slowly fade over several days.


Well there's a big clump of lilies, and the top shoots have orange flowers, and only one of the bottom shoots has the pink flower. But I guess they're just are different lilies for different plants. And if these are short, how tall are normal lilies?!
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jun 30, 2020 12:46 PM CST
Typically the regular ones are 3-5 feet tall. But I have one that is 8 feet tall!
Canada
MikyPiky
Jun 30, 2020 2:07 PM CST
pardalinum said:Typically the regular ones are 3-5 feet tall. But I have one that is 8 feet tall!


Wow 8 feet tall, they must be gigantic! Could you send me a pic?

Also the tallest stalk on my lily plant is only about 2 1/2 feet tall, so you're definitely right!
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Image
pardalinum
Jun 30, 2020 4:53 PM CST
Here you go... the tall one in the center rear. It is surrounded by its siblings, some of which are nearly as tall. In order to pollinate the blooms I have to try to get the step ladder in close enough to reach up, not an easy task. The cyclone fence is 6 feet tall.
Thumb of 2020-06-30/pardalinum/75ea94

Another view, it is leaning toward the camera. The wood fence is also 6 feet tall.

Thumb of 2020-06-30/pardalinum/fd72da

These are all sibling seedlings. The mother, whose name is 'Awesome', won best of show a couple of years ago at the North American Lily Society convention.


About your lilies, come fall I think you should carefully dig up the clump and separate them out so they have space. This is done when the leaves have died back or almost completely died back. Leave the stems in if they don't easily pull out. Later in early winter they should easily pull out, you just don't want to be rough on the bulb-stem connection.

Name: Debbie
Manitoba, Canada (Zone 3a)
Hostas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Critters Allowed Container Gardener Bulbs Annuals
Cat Lover Dog Lover Amaryllis Houseplants Foliage Fan Region: Canadian
Image
DebbieC
Jun 30, 2020 5:05 PM CST
Wow that is certainly impressive! How long does it take for them to grow that height from when they first emerg from the soil?
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Image
pardalinum
Jun 30, 2020 5:27 PM CST
Pretty quick! They started emerging sometime in March so we are looking at around 3 months to this point. This particular strain seems to be much more aggressive growers than most of my commercial lilies.
Canada
MikyPiky
Jul 1, 2020 9:02 AM CST
pardalinum said:Here you go... the tall one in the center rear. It is surrounded by its siblings, some of which are nearly as tall. In order to pollinate the blooms I have to try to get the step ladder in close enough to reach up, not an easy task. The cyclone fence is 6 feet tall.
Thumb of 2020-06-30/pardalinum/75ea94

Another view, it is leaning toward the camera. The wood fence is also 6 feet tall.

Thumb of 2020-06-30/pardalinum/fd72da

These are all sibling seedlings. The mother, whose name is 'Awesome', won best of show a couple of years ago at the North American Lily Society convention.


About your lilies, come fall I think you should carefully dig up the clump and separate them out so they have space. This is done when the leaves have died back or almost completely died back. Leave the stems in if they don't easily pull out. Later in early winter they should easily pull out, you just don't want to be rough on the bulb-stem connection.


Wow those are some amazing lilies! I can't imagine having those in my yard, they're gigantic!

Thank you for the advice on my lilies, I will most certainly do that later in the year. Smiling

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