Ask a Question forum→"Forest Gardening" - best solution or concoction to rid most tree/plant diseases

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Christmas Valley, OR
abacene
May 13, 2020 11:51 AM CST
NOTE: I do NOT want any more replies essentially saying that I am going to forever alter the forest if...
#1: Its MY forest, will be my property - we all alter things everywhere we go to some extent, don't make a mountain out of nothing.
#2: If any diseases are present and doing harm, I would like to do something about that. My intent is to take care of something that has been neglected, possibly affected by invasive species, (which I will also deal with) and helping living things in general - if you don't agree, please feel free to NOT reply.
#3: I'm sure that those who do not want to help and only criticize me on this would likely know of problems caused by mankind (such as invasive species, etc.) - should I let that damage continue and not do anything about it? and let a stand of old growth suffer and get worse - because of a thin, flimsy lack of reasoning on the part of people who only want to oppose and not help? No.
#4: I am asking for info, for help, not for every over-opinionated, somewhat ignorant negative opinion by whomever has too much time to kill and only wants to criticize. If you don't agree and don't want to help, then please keep your fringe opinions to yourself and do not reply.

I am about to purchase a small parcel of land (less than 2 acres) that has dense old growth trees and vegetation. I intend to do what I would call Forest Gardening, where I do not necessarily alter or landscape, but prune and care for the forest. I want to find some water-based concentrate or concoction that I can spray over the area that can remedy as many tree and plant diseases as possible to generally treat the area, and then to use on specific areas or trees/plants as well.

- Separately, same kinda thing for getting rid of problem insects, but not too nasty of a chemical, and preferably something natural.

What would be the best suggestion for such a concoction?
Thank you in advance


[Last edited by abacene - May 13, 2020 2:52 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 13, 2020 12:36 PM CST
Welcome!

The minute you start spraying for nonexistent plant diseases and nonexistent insect problems, you have altered the forest irreparably forever.
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Christmas Valley, OR
abacene
May 13, 2020 12:55 PM CST
DaisyI said: Welcome!

The minute you start spraying for nonexistent plant diseases and nonexistent insect problems, you have altered the forest irreparably forever.


(1) Not true, not at all, especially if I use something natural and organic.
(2) So I should just let everything go? Just let whatever is there have its way, even if its threatening old growth trees?

I AM going to alter my little patch of trees and bushes, almost no matter what I do, but in this case, I will be altering it by helping the trees and plants. Change is not bad, only bad change is bad.
[Last edited by abacene - May 13, 2020 12:56 PM (+)]
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Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
May 13, 2020 2:09 PM CST
It doesn't matter if your sprays are organic or not! Once you spray for things real or imagined, you alter the ecosystem.
Daisy is 110% right about that in my opinion.
Are you operating under the belief that you can do it better then Mother Nature. That doesn't seem right.
What disease do you think exists?
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 13, 2020 3:21 PM CST
You didn't mention invasive plant species in your first post. I would agree, get rid of them.

But, every plant disease has its own cause and its own cure. One size fits all doesn't exist.

Insects are good for the forest. I wouldn't kill any of them.

But I can see you had your mind set before you asked the question so I will keep the rest of my fringe opinions to myself. Maybe someone else will be brave enough to step in here.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Christmas Valley, OR
abacene
May 13, 2020 3:45 PM CST
DaisyI said:You didn't mention invasive plant species in your first post. I would agree, get rid of them.

But, every plant disease has its own cause and its own cure. One size fits all doesn't exist.

Insects are good for the forest. I wouldn't kill any of them.

But I can see you had your mind set before you asked the question so I will keep the rest of my fringe opinions to myself. Maybe someone else will be brave enough to step in here.


I am going to be helping between 1.5 and 5 acres of land, how does one do that without hiring a whole team or some crew? I cannot give particular attention to every individual tree and plant - not even possible. I need to do as much as possible over a large area without a lot of expense.
There are a number of things I can use that will do no harm to this forest and give benefit.
Christmas Valley, OR
abacene
May 13, 2020 3:58 PM CST
My approach is simple, find something that will not do much or any harm, and will prevent or stop as much damage as possible to generally help the area, and I can devote special time to a few particular problems. One nearly universal ingredient is common soap, with a variety of suggested other natural ingredients.
Next, I will adapt a 55 Gallon barrel, hook it up to compressed air with a special nozzle and be able to blast/spray water over quite some distance. I will likely be able to treat the whole parcel from one spot, but will move to spray the area from different angles.
This way I can do as much as possible with as little effort and expense as possible.
The question is what I mix up in this barrel, so far, dish soap.
Next, I have to weigh the pros and cons of using stuff such as pyrethrum, as it would also kill beneficial insects of course.
There are several ways to re-attract new insects from the surrounding area, and I will be planting plants that attract beneficial insects.
The best way to treat trees for wood borers is individually, but the next best way is to saturate the whole trunk of the tree with something - but what?
I want to get rid of as many pests, invasive species, and diseases as I can, even if it does mean decimating an insect population temporarily. Once that has been done I can focus on benefiting the area with beneficial insects, plants, etc.
Note: I do not intend to keep this parcel "old growth only", this is not a purist obsession, non-native trees and plants will be introduced by a special selection process.

I am specifically looking for suggestions on ingredients I can use in this process.
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gardenfish
May 13, 2020 4:05 PM CST
Because of your pre existing conditions for any answers you may receive, and your less than polite attitude of anyone attempting to help you, you will not receive many answers. Thumbs down
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Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
May 14, 2020 9:34 AM CST
abacene said:

I am going to be helping between 1.5 and 5 acres of land, how does one do that without hiring a whole team or some crew? I cannot give particular attention to every individual tree and plant - not even possible. I need to do as much as possible over a large area without a lot of expense.
There are a number of things I can use that will do no harm to this forest and give benefit.


What???

The problem seems to be one of "a little information"... It seems like you've heard about invasive species, defoliating insects and such, but have no personal experience with forested land.

Old growth forest is very difficult to come by...

Invasive insects... down here, we have pine beetles, emerald ash borer, and various fungus and viruses, like cedar-apple rust, fire blight, and... tons of other stuff.

Problem is... the solution for most of this is to cut down affected trees.

Don't know what harmful insects you are expecting up in Oregon, but... spraying an old growth forest for non-existant pests is not a good plan.

2-5 acres is tiny.

Maintaining that should require minimal time... old growth forest is already a climax forest. It should be done changing.

Down in the deep south where everything has been clear-cut... actually requires a lot more owner attention to encourage the kind of growth desired... and still... 5 acres is nothing.

Suggest further research. Sprays are not indicated.

Name: Deb
Planet Earth (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
May 14, 2020 10:11 AM CST
Warm welcome from a fellow PNWer. I'm up in Washington, north of Seattle. Although your initial post started out pretty defensive, I would first say this is not Facebook -- folks don't name call or deride others. For the most part, we are a cordial community.

In response to your desire to manage a small forest, I would encourage you to check into your local universities for information and/or courses. I recently (pre-pandemic) took a course offered by WSU entitled 'Forest Stewardship Coached Planning' which was very informative. It featured several speakers on issues from disease to wildlife to silvaculture. The resounding theme was forests will adequately self-manage - if in doubt, doing nothing is always a viable option. Here is my experience: we have about 10 acres of forest that has been largely undisturbed for the 40 years we have lived here. We used to run cows and horses who had access to the forest, but have not done so for about 15 years and have taken down much of our cross-fencing. It has been an absolute pleasure to watch the forest regenerate itself.

So, my advice is to simply sit back and observe for a year or so. Note what is growing, what seems to be having problems, what bugs (good or bad) are present, what invasive species you might have (or not). Is this a new property for you? Do you know how it was managed prior to your acquisition? Perhaps start with pathways and setting up some benches - then just spend time getting to know your forest. Give it time to make its own 'shift' and recover on its own. One of my favorite spots in my forest is a large swath of devil's club underplanted with ferns - it is quite spectacular.

Part of the WSU course was an on-site visit from a forester, which was also very helpful. He identified trees suffering from drought, noted an unusual number (for my area) of mature spruce, and answered all questions I peppered him with. That might be something your local university would offer as well.

Best of luck, and enjoy your woods.

Edit: Sorry, I have no suggestion for a multi-purpose spray.
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[Last edited by Bonehead - May 14, 2020 10:12 AM (+)]
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Christmas Valley, OR
abacene
May 14, 2020 1:21 PM CST
gardenfish said:Because of your pre existing conditions for any answers you may receive, and your less than polite attitude of anyone attempting to help you, you will not receive many answers. Thumbs down


OK, looks like this site is worse than a waste of time!
I asked a simple question, and all I get are people trying to shoot down what I am trying to do - and that's supposed to be good and ok? If people don't want to help, then keep your insulting negatives and 'you know everything and I know nothing' attitudes to yourself and DON'T POST! I have a HELL of a lot more experience in the outdoors, more than 90% and I know what the hell I am doing! I only asked for suggestions for ingredients - and did not received one suggestion for what I actually asked. I heave not received one single suggestion regarding what I asked, and have only seen NEGATIVE, NEGATIVE, NEGATIVE and personal insults!

It was a mistake coming to this forum, this is just another hang-out for another bunch of alleged 'know-it-all' - but have nothing to offer TROLLS!!!

Take your negative attitudes and shove them where the sun doesn't shine!
I will succeed in what I am doing - as long as I don't listen to what you people say!

[Last edited by abacene - May 14, 2020 1:26 PM (+)]
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Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
May 16, 2020 7:48 AM CST
Here's the thing... by attenpting to discourage you from making a mistake... we are trying to help you.

Unfortunately, it seems that you will not be helped...

I hope that when you come back, that you will be a bit more open-minded about the wisdom of what you have in mind, and recognize that some actions are best avoided.

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