Ask a Question forum→Monstera propagation tips

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Washington
Jacalyn079
May 13, 2020 9:41 PM CST
Hi there! I'm a beginner when it comes to plants. I was gifted two monstera plants. One that came from a cutting and another that already had roots. I put the cutting in water about 2.5 weeks ago and I think those are roots that are coming out. My question on this one is, how long should I wait to move this into soil? Why are my leaves not getting any holes? It only has one hole but it hasn't gotten bigger. Closer to the roots it looks like new leaves but they are brown, are they new leaves or is it part of the old stem? It also looks like the leaves have cracks in them. Is that normal? Then I have the second plant that I already put in soil, there is a baby leaf that is yellow. Why is that? I just got it about a couple days ago. Here are the pictures. The first 4 pictures are the cutting in water. The last two is the one I added to soil. Does water propagation grow roots faster? Does it look unhealthy to you? Any help or advise would be greatly appreciated!
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 14, 2020 9:50 AM CST
Welcome! Monstera cuttings can be rooted in water or in damp soil. The one you have in water looks like it has roots about big enough for it to be moved into a small pot with a porous potting mix. Make sure the white roots are covered lightly with damp potting mix, but keep it snugly potted. It will take time for the roots to transition from water to soil, so be patient.

The one that is already potted is still making the transition to soil so it is normal for it to lose some lower leaves. Let the top inch of soil get dry to the touch before watering it thoroughly.

More leaf fenestration will occur as the leaves mature. That is not something you can control.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Washington
Jacalyn079
May 14, 2020 11:58 PM CST
@WillC thank you for the reply! I was told to keep it in water longer so more roots would grow. Should I wait or put it on soil now? What would be better?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 15, 2020 7:28 AM CST
There is no hard-and-fast rule as to when to make the transition. In general, you want a minimum of two roots that are at least an inch long, but more is probably a bit better. It really doesn't make much difference. What matters most is how well you manage the watering of the soil after you move it into a pot.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Washington
Jacalyn079
May 15, 2020 9:13 AM CST
@WillC thank you for the reply! I was told to keep it in water longer so more roots would grow. Should I wait or put it on soil now? What would be better?
Washington
Jacalyn079
May 15, 2020 9:19 AM CST
@WillC thanks! What soil would you recommend?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 15, 2020 9:20 AM CST
See my previous reply.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 15, 2020 9:21 AM CST
Use a porous potting mix that is peat based and has added perlite mixed throughout.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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