Annuals forum→Snapdragons

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Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 14, 2020 6:35 AM CST
I planted some snapdragons in a bed by the patio. Love snapdragons. That was three years ago. Two of the plants are still growing strong. Snapdragons are annuals. Not sure if I've gotten lucky, the laziness in me of not cleaning the bed is enough of a mulch to protect the plant, the lack of a heavy deep snow (despite subzero temps), or if the plant is a genetic mutation and is now both capable of surviving our winters and mind control. I really want it to be the genetic mutation with mind control. It's not reseeding itself, the stem from the previous year is still in the ground and growth starts from that main stem. It's already a foot high in growth. I might save some seed this season and start some more to see if those survive the winter as well. The other one is in the bed in the front yard around the porch. Likely save some of those as well.

I suspect that the weather just hasn't been severe enough to take the plant out, but the temps did get pretty cold for several days, just low snow totals. Maybe that with the leaves surrounding the plant has been enough insulation.
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Name: ZenMan
rural Kansas (Zone 5b)
Kansas 5b
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ZenMan
May 14, 2020 9:28 AM CST
Hello Thomas,

" Two of the plants are still growing strong. Snapdragons are annuals. Not sure if I've gotten lucky, the laziness in me of not cleaning the bed is enough of a mulch to protect the plant, the lack of a heavy deep snow (despite subzero temps), or if the plant is a genetic mutation and is now both capable of surviving our winters and mind control. "

I think my zinnias practice mind control over me. But you may be on to something with those snaps. You very well could have a good mutation there, with the promise of getting the best of both worlds between annuals and perennials. Annuals tend to bloom all season, whereas perennials tend to be "one shots". A perennial that blooms all season would be something. If I weren't breeding zinnias I might be breeding snaps. They come in a wide color range like zinnias, including bi-colors, and both double and single flower forms. You could cross your mutant snap with them to get a whole strain of new ornamentals. Snapdragons are currently available in a very wide range of strains.

https://www.hazzardsgreenhouse...

Amateur plant breeding can be a fascinating hobby. To show what is possible, these are some of my zinnias that are not available in seed packets.
Thumb of 2020-05-14/ZenMan/7e36bf Thumb of 2020-05-14/ZenMan/dde36f
Thumb of 2020-05-14/ZenMan/083c10 Thumb of 2020-05-14/ZenMan/2bedc3
I have been concentrating on new flower forms in zinnias, but a perennial one like your snap would be a real find. Plant breeding can be a fascinating hobby.

ZM (not associated with any product or vendor mentioned or linked)
I tip my hat to you.

Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
May 14, 2020 11:31 AM CST
Thomas, I'm a little bit south of you, but in one of the gardens the Master Gardeners take care of we planted some snapdragon seed. It has been a perennial ever since. I don't know the particular variety. I know it's not re seeding itself because we deadhead this garden.
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Mother Teresa
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 14, 2020 1:07 PM CST
Isn't everything in Arkansas a perennial? I mean yes some plants are technically and will always be annuals, but if the environment is conducive, then the plant will live as long as it can. And that's pretty much what these snapdragons are doing. They just aren't dying. True perennials will die back and produce new shoots. These plants aren't cut back but somehow survive the harsh conditions that should kill them and continue growing. Still gonna save some seeds because it's a great bushy type of snapdragon.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
May 14, 2020 1:27 PM CST
My snapdragons have been known to survive the winter from time to time. I have two snapdragons that survived this year. One was planted in a self-watering planter with daylilies. The other is in a small plastic pot I got from a nursery. I'm really surprised that one survived but it was surrounded by other similar pots all placed in a grow bag. We also had an extremely mild winter. They are getting buds now. If I can remember I'll take some pictures and post them. The plants don't look all that great though but since I didn't grow any from seed this year I'm happy they survived.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
May 14, 2020 3:54 PM CST
Thomas, well, yes a lot of what are annuals elsewhere can be perennials here. Take that annual dianthus sold in the spring. Here it behaves like a true perennial. Just cut it back the next spring, and voila! New blooms. Pineapple sage sometimes comes back, sometimes not. There are a lot of salvias not rated for here that are true perennials now. Climate change.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
May 14, 2020 5:40 PM CST
Went out back and took some pictures of my snaps. Not the best pics but I was short on time.

Snapdragon in planter:

Thumb of 2020-05-14/bxncbx/5d7c79
Thumb of 2020-05-14/bxncbx/012b79

Snapdragon in pot:

Thumb of 2020-05-14/bxncbx/90a711
Thumb of 2020-05-14/bxncbx/2a3ae6

The one in the pot is from the Frosted series. I find it to be more cold hardy. The variegation only shows up in cool weather so in summer it's just green.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
May 15, 2020 1:45 AM CST
I really like the variegated one!
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Mother Teresa
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
May 15, 2020 7:10 PM CST
I'm in zone 6a and I've had snaps survive mild winters...
they are one of the few I start inside, because they do really great started from seed and moved in ground before last frost to give me the garden fix I jones in March.
The plural of anecdote is not data.
Seattle, WA (Zone 8b)
NewbieGardner
May 16, 2020 12:30 AM CST
I had planted snapdragon. It was perenial for 3 years.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
May 16, 2020 2:04 AM CST
Ours are three years old. Thumbs up
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Mother Teresa
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 16, 2020 2:07 PM CST
Here's a picture of mine. I guess there's at least two in the back bed.
Thumb of 2020-05-16/thommesM/267131

Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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gardenfish
May 16, 2020 2:34 PM CST
Haha! Someone else that has to pick acorns out of their garden bed! Such a pain in the @#$&!
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
May 16, 2020 3:20 PM CST
Those look good!
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 16, 2020 5:18 PM CST
gardenfish said:Haha! Someone else that has to pick acorns out of their garden bed! Such a pain in the @#$&!


Nah. I let them rot in place. I'll simply cover them with some mulch.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Northern NJ (Zone 6b)
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LorettaNJ
May 16, 2020 10:27 PM CST
Thomas, I am in zone 6 and have also had snapdragons overwinter but usually just 2 years. More likely, snapdragons fizzle out because of heat here.
And I also leave the acorns in place now plus some leaves and dead material. I gotta give those worms something else to eat besides my plant roots.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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gardenfish
May 17, 2020 2:31 AM CST
I have to pick the acorns out, because the acorns that fall into my beds are from a willow oak tree next door. They are tiny and seem to worm their way into the dirt and sprout. It's much easier picking up the acorns than pulling the seedlings. Those things go deep!
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 17, 2020 4:09 AM CST
gardenfish said:Those things go deep!


No doubt! I sort of switch back and forth on what I do. I have red oaks. There are years where you can't walk on the grass after then fall because they are so thick. One spring I did go out and rip up baby oaks with pliers because so many acorns had sprouted. I'll rake the front yard, but not really worry about the back. The few that sprout in the back I can deal with. One year I was picking up acorns and the neighbor next door asked if I was going to eat them. I know you can, but they are bitter. One of the guys I sold tomato plants to said they actually picked them up, shelled them, roasted them and then ground them into flour. Takes the bitterness out he said.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
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gardenfish
May 17, 2020 10:37 AM CST
I've hear of that. Native Americans did that. You are also supposed to be able to make a coffee substitute out of the roasted meal. Never tried either.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Northern NJ (Zone 6b)
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LorettaNJ
May 18, 2020 3:37 PM CST
I will send you some of my squirrels and chipmunks and blue jays. They will take care of those acorns for you.
We just have pin oak. They aren't too hard to pull. The hickory in the back is another story. I am going to have to use Roundup on those, something I usually only use for poison ivy.

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