Roses forum→Hello from Willinator, Roses I have a problem with a rose

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Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
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Willinator
May 14, 2020 7:20 AM CST
Hello everyone,

I am looking for some help!!

My 'Gruss an Aachen' has a problem with very
chlorotic leaves and when I figure out how to convert
the pictures of this condition from "heic" format to
"jpeg" I will post the pictures of the rose and its condition.

Until then does anyone have any suggestions on what to
do??
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
May 14, 2020 12:51 PM CST
I use Holly Tone or dilute Miracid fertilizer.
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 14, 2020 3:45 PM CST
Here are the pictures of the 'Gruss an Aachen'


Thumb of 2020-05-14/Willinator/3bac24
Thumb of 2020-05-14/Willinator/37bad6

Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 17, 2020 2:27 PM CST
Will someone tell me why my 'Gruss an Aachen'
has such chloratic leaves, What do you think is
the problem with this rose??
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 17, 2020 3:52 PM CST
If a plant is found to be chlorotic, it is not producing enough chlorophyll—you know, the stuff that makes a plant green and allows for a plant to do photosynthesis. Chlorosis usually occurs when a plant is highly active and uses up all the minerals in its soil. The key mineral in deficit in a case of chlorosis is iron, so a chlorotic plant can be compared to some extent to an anemic human. The chlorosis symptoms show up on new growth because the older growth has already established its chlorophyll content. When the plant attempts to produce new leaves, there is not enough iron available for the plant to create a healthy green leaf.

I use liquid Chelated Iron.
Those light leaves will never stop looking that way.
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 17, 2020 4:15 PM CST
I will have to find some good fertilizers which will add iron to the soil.
One thing that I wonder about is what will alfalfa add to the soil and
or a good organic liquid fertilizer.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
May 17, 2020 5:35 PM CST
I believe that if the pH of the soil is too high, the rose will be unable to use the iron even if plentiful.
Porkpal
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 17, 2020 8:28 PM CST
Chelated Liquid Iron is to be used for the correction and prevention of foliage yellowing due to Iron deficiency of flowers, shrubs, trees, vegetables, and lawns.
Recommended as a foliar spray application, this delivers iron directly to the deficient leaves for faster results. Foliar applications also result in much lower iron additions into the soil when compared to traditional soil drench applications, resulting in less wastage and lower risk of soil toxicity.
Apply in a sufficient volume of water to thoroughly wet the foliage and run-off in the root zone. Hose attached sprayers provide a convenient method to treat lawns.
.
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
Image
jerijen
May 18, 2020 5:31 PM CST
Might be worthwhile to check your soil and water. If the pH is too high the plant won't be able to access iron.

I grok this because mine runs about 8.3-8.5 . . .
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 24, 2020 2:57 PM CST
Well I am not sure what to do now I tried a foliar feed of chelated iron and the leaves are still
chlorotic I might see if I can find some Miracid because it might help and lower the PH.
I might find that at Home Depot. Otherwise I might try another rose in that half barrel.
This time it will be maybe a china rose with pink or red blooms so that I can harvest
petals for Rose Tarragon Vinegar
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
May 25, 2020 7:23 AM CST
I use Miracid or holly tone on many of my roses, especially certain Hybrid Musks, although I have noticed with time and root establishment this has become less necessary. As yours are potted, you'll probably always need something, so I would go with the liquid Miracid for a potted rose.
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
May 25, 2020 7:24 AM CST
I use Miracid or holly tone on many of my roses, especially certain Hybrid Musks, although I have noticed with time and root establishment this has become less necessary. As yours are potted, you'll probably always need something, so perhaps go with the liquid Miracid for a potted rose.
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 26, 2020 3:00 PM CST
OK I did a pH test on the container with the 'Gruss an Aachen' and the pH tested at 7 which is
absolutely neutral so I don't need to get it much lower if at all. I may try a different rose next
year. I will consider planting it in the Fall.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 26, 2020 7:34 PM CST
Willinator said:Well I am not sure what to do now I tried a foliar feed of chelated iron and the leaves are still
chlorotic I might see if I can find some Miracid because it might help and lower the PH.
I might find that at Home Depot. Otherwise I might try another rose in that half barrel.
This time it will be maybe a china rose with pink or red blooms so that I can harvest
petals for Rose Tarragon Vinegar

Those old leaves will NEVER change color, only the new leaves will look proper.
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 26, 2020 7:36 PM CST
Willinator said:OK I did a pH test on the container with the 'Gruss an Aachen' and the pH tested at 7 which is
absolutely neutral so I don't need to get it much lower if at all. I may try a different rose next
year. I will consider planting it in the Fall.

Repot the rose with new soil and see what happens.
For some reason, some times the dirt in a container just is bad, just the way it is.
PH 7 is too high.

Chlorosis is the yellowing of the plant leaves for the lack of chlorophyll. There are two types of chlorosis. Chlorosis and Interveinal chlorosis.
Causes

It will happen because of the deficiency of nitrogen, oxygen, or iron. Generally, nitrogen or oxygen deficiency can be the cause of chlorosis but iron deficiency is the cause of the interveinal chlorosis.

Interverinal chlorosis is more complex than chlorosis and it mostly occurs to the rose bushes. Sounds sad, right? But have a simple solution. Keep reading-

The main reason for the iron deficiency in the plant is high soil pH. You should know, Rose plants can't absorb required iron because of high pH. If the pH will be not high, then it may be the cause of iron deficiency in the soil.

There are also some secondary reason of the interveinal problem such as compact soil, high salt, and manganese and zinc deficiency in the soil
Identification

If the leaves of the rose turn yellow and curl but the vein remains green, then it will be caused by iron deficiency.

But if the vein also turns yellow as well as leaves, the chlorosis occurs due to oxygen deficiency or poor drainage facilities.

Want to know the easy way to identify iron deficiency?
Then you should know, Upper leaves or young leaves turn yellow because of iron deficiency and nitrogen behaves the opposite.

Controlling Measures and Prevention
Here I will give you only the treatment of interveinal chlorosis. Because iron can increase the availability of nitrogen. So, If the chlorosis occurs due to the nitrogen deficiency, you don't need to add extra nitrogen.

Let's learn how to fight against interveinal chlorosis-
Rose love slightly acidic soil. Test the soil pH with a pH meter(our pick: Atree Soil pH Meter). If the pH is high, add some acid-forming fertilizer (sulfur, peat moss, or leaf mold). But if the pH already remain under 6.5, add some iron amendments such as greensand, cottonseed meal, Iron tone or Ironite.

If you need a quick solution, then forget all. Just apply 1/4 teaspoon of iron chelate or iron sulfate on rose bushes.


[Last edited by RpR - May 26, 2020 7:58 PM (+)]
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Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 26, 2020 8:17 PM CST
Well since the soil tested at exactly 7 I guess I might just add some sulfur to decrease the pH to about 6.5 or so. Then we will see what happens and it is interveinal as you can see from the pictures above. I think I will get some Rose Soil and Replace some of the soil in the 1/2 barrel that the Rose is in. I can get that at the nursery where I got the sulfur.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
May 27, 2020 3:11 AM CST
From my experience with just one, (potted rosebush). It was a Rosa roxburghii .
https://www.helpmefind.com/ros...
It took about two to three weeks to recover until it greened all over. Although the effects of ammeding with an iron source, will appear in new growth, there's a stage of the leaf developmemnt that if iron is provided then the whole plant will acquire deeper green. Chlorosis starts at first almost unnnoticed. Some leaves if given the needed iron will green up, whilst those that are just too yellow will stay that way. Eventually they'll fall off and the overall look of the plant will be OK.
Arturo
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
Image
Willinator
May 27, 2020 7:39 AM CST
Well if I treat with Sulphur it should take several weeks for the plant and soil to be affected.
I am also going to get some Rose Soil today and see about replacing some of the soil in the
1/2 Barrel Container I will find some place to put the old soil.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
May 27, 2020 8:22 AM CST
You will still need to allow it time to recover, so plan to ignore it for a while whatever you decide to do.
Porkpal
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
May 27, 2020 8:39 AM CST
porkpal said:You will still need to allow it time to recover, so plan to ignore it for a while whatever you decide to do.


Yes, I agree I agree Micronutrients take their time before anything can be observed. With ph 7 I don't think you need to acidify your soil at all. With either chelated iron or ferrous sulphate ( used for ammending rhododendrons and much cheaper) you will be set. Also once inside the bush iron will stay there . It is not used up like a first grade metabolite. It is used as a co-enzyme which means that it is needed to speed up a metabolic pathway that once moving it is freed into the sap, until needed again. I've read a study that shows that in iron poor soils, iron ammendment is only needed in early spring growth during the first leafing out.

Arturo
[Last edited by hampartsum - May 27, 2020 10:10 AM (+)]
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