Ask a Question forum→Newbie Q's in Vines and Climbers

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Name: Tim
Kelso, WA, USA (Zone 8a)
heticu7
May 14, 2020 12:11 PM CST
Hello.

I posted a somewhat lengthy thread in Vines and Climbers. I am brand new at gardening and would appreciate any experienced feedback regarding climbing vines. Thanks!

Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
May 14, 2020 12:52 PM CST
Welcome! what kind are you looking for? Spring blooming only? Or starting in spring and blooming through the fall? Where do you want to put it? These answers would be very helpful in any gardener who answers this post to help you. Rolling my eyes.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Name: Tim
Kelso, WA, USA (Zone 8a)
heticu7
May 14, 2020 2:00 PM CST
Or, someone could go read my posting in "Vines and Climbers". Its all explained there. :)
Milpitas, CA
SoulReaver009
May 14, 2020 2:26 PM CST
Heticu7 said,

"Hello.

I am a 65 year-old (male) retired manufacturing engineer as of 2014. I bought my retirement home and moved here two years ago, in a 55+ park in Kelso, WA. Until a few weeks ago, I had never before in my life considered getting into gardening. But, one day this vine started growing out of the ground next to my front deck that I thought I had cleared last fall. This intrigued me, so I went and bought a 12"x48" trellis and tied it up. It grew so fast that I ended up buying a 32"x72" trellis and set it up around the smaller one. That vine is still growing. Sometimes I think I can see it growing if I stand there and watch it long enough. :)

Then I had an idea to buy some seeds of flowering vines like I had taken many photos of at Butchart Gardens, Victoria, BC back in 2015, and plant them so they would grow up the front deck awning supports (those typically found in manufactured home parks). I went online and did some searching and found the following site:
countryliving.com/gardening/garden-ideas/advice/g1456/fast-growing-vines/
called "20 Best Flowering Vines and Vine Plants to Add to Your Garden". I picked out 7 that I thought I would like to have growing around my house and went on Amazon and ordered the seeds for them:

Blue Crown Passion Flower (Passiflora caerulea) (for a chain-link fence in my front yard)
Dutchman's Pipe (Aristolochia macrophylla)
Trumpet Vine (Campsis)
Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens)
Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis)
Chocolate Vine (Akebia quinata)
Hops (Humulus lupulus) -- (I know they don't flower, I just think they're cool looking)

Now I am perplexed about a couple of things, and was hoping for some clarification from someone here:
1. Some seeds are not arriving right away, though they have already shipped:
Wisteria -- June 2 to June 23
Chocolate Vine -- June 12 to June 17
And the Coral Trumpet has not yet shipped (placed the order on May 8) and they say it won't arrive until July 28 thru August 28.

Why? Amazon did not say they were "not in stock"; they just provided these estimated arrival dates after I bought them. And 2 of them have apparently already shipped. And we're talking about something that can fit into a letter envelope. Confused

2. The other puzzlement is the sowing instructions on the ones I have received:
a. Blue Crown Passion: "... paper towel trick ... warm water, fold over twice, seeds inside, fold again ... place in ziplock bag ... place on warm surface to expose seeds to extreme heat ... when seeds pop open place the small sprouts in starter pots for transfer later ... " Huh? Blinking
b. Dutchman's Pipe: "soak 48 hrs in warm water ... seeds in plastic bag with teaspoon of perlite ... store in fridge at 40F for 90 days ... check for mold if too moist ... next, surface sow seeds, lightly cover, maintain soil at 70F ..." Again, huh? Thinking

Granted, I said upfront I was completely ignorant of gardening, but my big question is: Why can't I just take some seeds outside and poke them into the ground where I want them to grow, and let God take over from there? Isn't that what seeds are supposed to do when you put them into the ground?

Any clarification, advice and/or corrections would be greatly appreciated! (Sorry for making this so long a posting)
Thanks!"
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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gardenfish
May 14, 2020 4:09 PM CST
Ok, here goes. I would never attempt to grow these from seed, and I'm an experienced gardener. The reason for the detailed instructions is that many seeds need more work on them than just poking them in the ground. I've never heard of using heat for a passion vine, but the method for the Dutchman's pipe is called cold stratification. This a method done mainly for native plants. When you do this to seed, you are mimicking the conditions in the wild that it would go through to germinate. The seed would fall to the ground in the late fall, and stay there throughout the winter.In the spring, the rain and warmer temps would nudge it to germinate. I can't answer why Amazon sent such confusing messages. For myself, I would never buy seed from Amazon; I only buy seeds online from well known, accredited seed companies.
Buying these as plants is the best way to go. Even when you buy small plants, say in the 4" pots they are typically grown in, by the third year they have attained nearly their optimal growth. Growing from seed, even if you can get them to germinate, will not give you these results.
I'm really sorry to be appearing to rain on you're parade. I think that writing up the seeds as a loss and purchasing plants is the better option .
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Name: Tim
Kelso, WA, USA (Zone 8a)
heticu7
May 14, 2020 4:38 PM CST
gardenfish said:... I think that writing up the seeds as a loss and purchasing plants is the better option .


<sigh> Okay. I was beginning to think that way once I started getting the seeds and reading those instructions. I appreciate your explanation on the cold stratification; that helped me understand the strange processes.

So, if I deduce correctly, that is the primary purpose of plant nurseries. To do all the hard work to get seeds to that planting stage so that we beginner gardeners can just put them in the ground.

Are you permitted by this forum to suggest a good online source for me to buy these young plants? Or would it be better for me to find local nurseries and see what they can get for me?

Thanks!
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Bookworm Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California
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ctcarol
May 14, 2020 6:49 PM CST
Annie's Annuals does a lot of business on line, and is on the west coast. She has some interesting plants, and a relatively easy search mode.
Name: Tim
Kelso, WA, USA (Zone 8a)
heticu7
May 14, 2020 7:04 PM CST
Thanks, Carol! That is definitely an interesting online store.

How do they package the plants so that they arrive undamaged?
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Bookworm Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California
Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
May 14, 2020 7:35 PM CST
I can't answer you on that. I haven't ordered from her in years, but it was fine then. Unfortunately for me, her plants aren't available when I need to get them. The few times I did , we had one of our 3 day heatwaves two days after I got the plants in the ground. The plants got cooked. I haven't read any bad reviews, and still drool over the catalogs, but down here we depend on Sunset zones rather than USDA zones...just too many zones in Ca. Annie's is about 500mi. north of me.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
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gardenfish
May 15, 2020 1:55 AM CST
Please check out AlmostEdenPlants, a wonderful place that has an excellent reputation. They have both passion vines and Dutchman's pipes. They are out of a lot of the passion vines , they sell out early, but may still have some available. Another good place to look is Onalees. She mostly sells Japanese morning glory seeds, but she does have passion vines. Another top rated company. Or you could do a google search for native plant nurseries, then vet the site through Davesgarden. Davesgarden I use all the time. Besides rating online companies they have a plant search where you type in the plant you want and they give you a list of nurseries that have that plant. Saves so much time!
Annie's is a wonderful company too, although they tend to sell out early also.
Good luck! Keep us up to date on your progress.
Oh, as far as shipping, most good companies package plants very well. They usually arrive in very good shape.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa

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