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Avatar for dsisinni
May 14, 2020 1:31 PM CST
Pennsylvania
I purchased several young forsythia to line the edge of my property. They seem very healthy. They were flowering when planted and now have healthy green leaves. Despite being healthy, several of the shoots are growing along the ground.

First question - is this normal? Second question - assuming normal, and knowing that I want these plants to grow both out and up (as I want them for privacy), does anyone recommend tying them to a wooden stake or something to keep them growing upwards instead of snaking along the ground?

Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks!
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May 14, 2020 8:41 PM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
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Welcome!
I would try staking them. However, I would also watch for any brand new stems starting that do try to grow straight up. If new straight stems start, then cut off the laying down ones.
Forsythia can be pretty rangy, spreading bushes. Don't be afraid to prune now. But Don't prune after about midsummer or you cut off next years flowers.
Plant it and they will come.
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May 15, 2020 12:53 AM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
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I would not stake them. The beauty of Forsythia for me is found it their gorgeous spreading form. To alter that with staking doesn't help in my opinion.
They are known to root themselves when the branches bend and touch the ground.
I would just carefully prune lower branches to take some of the weight off of them letting them go more upright.
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
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May 15, 2020 1:50 AM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
See next post
Plant it and they will come.
Last edited by sallyg May 15, 2020 1:54 AM Icon for preview
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May 15, 2020 1:53 AM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
Spreading form is true. Best if they have a good 6 feet clearance on each side so you do not have to keep cutting them. But they can become huge, unruly monsters.
Good article
https://www.hortmag.com/headli...
Plant it and they will come.
Avatar for dsisinni
May 21, 2020 9:59 PM CST
Pennsylvania
Thnx for responses - does this bush (just planted this year look healthy) - photos showing what looks like wilted leaves. Any thoughts appreciated!
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Last edited by dsisinni May 21, 2020 10:00 PM Icon for preview
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May 22, 2020 6:19 AM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
They should not be wilted. That is severe wilt. But I see non-wilted parts too..?
We are getting a good soaking rain here this, morning, but it's been very dry till now for a week. And windy- that really dries things out.
Plant it and they will come.
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