Plant ID forum→Perennial shrub id

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Name: Imaeus
Dayton, ohio
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Imaeus
May 15, 2020 1:29 PM CST
Hello. This shrub has been busting out....my mom would love to know what it is please.


Thumb of 2020-05-15/Imaeus/c5b322

Name: Lee-Roy
Bilzen, Belgium (Zone 8a)
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Arico
May 15, 2020 2:58 PM CST
oakleaf hydrangea?
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
May 15, 2020 3:11 PM CST
Agree with Arico - those are sprouts of Oakleaf Hydrangea, Hydrangea quercifolia.
John
Name: Imaeus
Dayton, ohio
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Imaeus
May 15, 2020 6:34 PM CST
The leaves have a velvety fuzz type of coating that seems natural.
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
May 15, 2020 6:42 PM CST
Here's our database entry for Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)

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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
May 16, 2020 7:35 AM CST
It looks like someone cut them back severely. Wonder why...Oakleaf Hydrangea should be perfectly hardy in Dayton.

Leaf description includes dark green and glabrous above, whitish to brownish tomentose beneath. That may be what you are describing as velvety fuzz.
John
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
May 16, 2020 3:19 PM CST
You should be able to confirm soon if it is an oakleaf (it looks like it is) as oakleaf hydrangeas are amongst the earliest blooming hydrangeas. So, if it recently leafed out then it should open blooms soon thereafter. I have had oakleaf bloomage here for almost a month now.

Most varieties of oakleaf hydrangeas are rather large so, maybe the owner is keeping its size in check by pruning it. Newer varieties like Munchkin, Ruby Slippers, Pee Wee, Sikes Dwarf, Jetstream and Vaughn's Lillie are more compact than huge ones like Alice, etc.

It is a remarkable plant for its power to bloom in dense shade and prosper. Supplemental water is needed when temperatures exceed 85F temporarily, when temperatures exceed 85F regularly and/or in very windy conditions. It is probably the most drought tolerant of the hydrangeas. But to further conserve soil moisture, I always recommend 2-4" of organic mulch (no rocks).

Leaves are dark green but new foliage may be lighter green for a while. Mature leaves may get as big as 8-12 inch saucers. Some varieties may be a bit glossy looking on the top of the leaves and gray-ish on the lower surfaces. The display of autumn colors is nothing short of spectacular when they get direct sunlight on the leaves as temperatures recede in the Fall. I get reds, purples, yellows, oranges and brown colors. I also find that the leaves can withstand more frost than my hydrangea arborescens and macrophyllas. The oakleaf leaves feel thicker than the leaves of those two other types of hydrangeas. Two of my oakleaf hydrangeas stay sort-of evergreen through winter and last year's foliage drops only when there is leaf out between February-April. During winter, the leaves from these two (Pee Wee and Snow Queen) stay pliable, hydrated and with the colors that they had during the Fall. Must be some micro-climate as others elsewhere tend to dry out their leaves and these then "disintegrate" on their own.

Do not let the plant sit on wet soil for too long as they can develop root rot if you exceed this "too long" time frame. I learned this the hard way after an El Nino Event dumped torrential rains for months in my area one year and an Alice Oakleaf Hydrangea caught root rot. Its location tended to drain poorly when we got hit with large amounts of rainfall every week for 3-4 months. But on normal years, the regular rains and water from the sprinkler system gave no indication that water would accumulate in its location as bad as it did that year. Afterwards, I had a landscape company do some work in that area to fix the problem.

Do not water the leaves. Instead water the soil in order to minimize chances of developing fungal leaf infections. If you do overhead watering "often enough", they may develop powdery mildew, cercospora leaf spot or rust (fungal infections).
[Last edited by luis_pr - May 16, 2020 3:55 PM (+)]
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