Plant ID forum→Red/green bush? Help identify!

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New York
notsosunnystate
May 17, 2020 9:06 AM CST
Hello! So my house has a ton of things sprouted up, lots of hostas & other things. But there's things that I don't know what in the heck they are.
This bush is coming up, and my landlord said if you maintain it, when it grows it has *pink* flowers. She doesn't know what it is, and I at first thought maybe it was a red tip photinia but I don't know!
I'll post pictures of it sprouting, and one from google view (from about 2014-2016) of what it grows to be like.
There's mini ones coming up in the garden, and google doesn't show that & she knows nothing of mini ones coming up. They hacked it down last fall because the last tenant didn't take care of it. I'm trying to clean up the lawn and all the flower beds but I want to know what things are before I decide to put anything else down near them.

Pictures: google map photo of it grown. And current photos of it coming up + the small ones.
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Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
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oneeyeluke
May 18, 2020 3:12 AM CST
The shrub on top looks like a Abelia grandiflora and the three bottom photos with woody stems are red tip photinia, but I'm not sure what second photo is.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
New York
notsosunnystate
May 22, 2020 2:52 PM CST
Oneeyeluke, thank you! I'm not sure either. They all are growing to look the same but the smaller ones are oddly spreading out? I have pictures of them getting bigger. I just don't get why these mini ones are sprouting up! My mom wants me to uproot one for her 😂
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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
May 23, 2020 11:00 AM CST
Hi notsosunnystate:

Ah, the joy of a new garden that nobody took care of - and nobody knew what anything was to properly do so to start with!

I'm sorry I did not see your post before just now.

I don't believe you have an Abelia sp. nor a Photinia sp. (or whatever its rename might be), but I would ask you to provide some more diagnostic information. Since you have a proliferation of stems and growth there (due to the plant being whacked back to earth), prune off a longer stem or three and take it to a good spot to take clear crisp closeup photos of the woody stems, the soft fleshy stems of new growth, the leaves (top and underside), and how the leaf attachment is arranged along the stems. This information often is required to separate closely related species, as well as plants whose leaves look very much alike (think Rosaceae members, such as I think you have). With that kind of information, I think you will get a definitive answer on what you have there.

Note that where each leaf attaches to the stem, there are a couple of circular looking appendages, kind of like small circular leaves. Those are called stipules, and they don't occur in such obvious fashion on many different species. That is a big clue to identity. Your seventh and eighth pictures show this feature pretty well.

You have noted that you have a bunch of "minis" of what looks like the same plant, emerging from areas that are radiating or extending away from the center of the original plants. Kind of like along where major roots might be growing...

That's another big clue. Not every kind of plant will do that. This happens in response to the entire top being cut off. The plant is forcing dormant or adventitious buds in order to rapidly create a lot of foliage for photosynthesis, and recover the canopy that keeps all the parts of the plant alive. You could gently dig around a mass of those sprouts, especially a group that's far away from the main center of the plant and ones that you don't intend to allow to mature anyway, and take pictures of that in place. Or dig it up, wash off the root system you find, photograph it, and then pot it up for your mom.

At this point, I think you have a very poorly treated Chaenomeles speciosa - Common Floweringquince. Fortunately, this plant is used to/capable of surviving such abuse - and will continue to happily grow on. I don't grow this plant at the Valley, but have had the pleasure (!) of working with it in landscapes over my career.

I may be wrong; that's why additional diagnostic information is useful for all to evaluate.




John
New York
notsosunnystate
May 24, 2020 7:43 AM CST
Viburnumvalley, ah I appreciate your comment very much. When I go out side today, I'll try to get better close ups. That's the sad part of phone camera quality, they do not show well. The only thing I know is: this past fall, the owner hacked it down to the ground, leaving a stub. She said once upon a time there was a single mini grown, which is barely shown in the google photo infront of the mass bush. It has jagged leaf edges, the bees love it too. I was hoping for a photinia but I honestly don't know. The owner, said her previous tenant had ZERO interest in keeping up on the property. Hence why the bush was hacked, as were our hedges infront of the house. I don't know if it makes a difference, it probably does, but I recently discovered our soil is very much clay mixed with sand. Que digging into the garden around the tree, digging about 5 inches under very dark soil (Assuming garden soil from a big box store) to find straight up clay. Like you could take it to a pottery class. Very damp. I thought our soil was acidic because of all of the types of weeds we have (dandelions, false dandelions, 34 stalks of knotweed, plantains (I assume one is buckhorn plantain, crabgrass, etc. practically 0 basic grass) and the plants that are here. All hostas, 10-15. This bush, and a bug eaten tulip. Out back with the knotweed I found ferns growing and lily of the valleys (whose little white bells are coming up!) along with more hostas. But I'm honestly unsure, I did the DIY soil vinegar/bakingsoda test and it pushed to be alkaline. I still personally think it's acidic. I'm not sure if that would help to know but I'm still learning about this place, and about landscape in general. I'll get some more close ups. The stems of the mass bush when it was cut to the grown cut showed wood texture stalks coming from the ground and I haven't seen them now that they're growing, but I do see the stalks the leafs are on are green/red slim, and from growth from ground these "minis" have green/red fleshed smooth skinny stalks, not wood like the mass, because when the mass was coming up it showed thicker wooded stalks at the base. Literally like it was clean cut off with a saw or a machete.. I'll get more photos but here's a close up of the minis from the day I posted this, and also pictures from a couple weeks ago of it coming up. Angel
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Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jun 8, 2020 6:30 AM CST
Ditto on flowering quince... I was at your other thread... thinking quince...
New York
notsosunnystate
Jun 10, 2020 11:19 AM CST
So I had a new thread, but someone said I should post here as the update 😅 well I think you both are right honestly. I looked up that quince bush, and looked specifically at leaf pictures and it's 100% the same. I haven't seen any kind of budding on it, only leafs. I trimmed it back a bit and shortened bad branches, and I did cut down the "baby" ones because they're honestly in the way in bad places. LL knew nothing about others (babies) coming up, only the one mass bush. But I definitely think you guys are right!!!! That never ever popped up when I was hunting for answers. Only the red photinia. I'll add some new pictures and I'm gonna add TWO google photos LAST to show the leaf thing!! Thank you soooooo much! Hurray! Thank You!
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