Soil and Compost forum→Can I add kitchen scraps instantly to soil?

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Charlotte, NC (Zone 7b)
kevin101
May 18, 2020 2:28 PM CST
Half of my yard is clay. The other half is sand.

Instead of composting, wondering if I can just put kitchen scraps in blender. Then mix fine cut up stuff into soil directly?

Or maybe dry the cut up first, then mix. Sort of like mix coffee ground to soil without composting.
Will that be ok?

Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 18, 2020 5:52 PM CST
Yes you can. You can do it just about anyway you want to. I might be careful with how much coffee grounds I add, like adding 5 pounds at a time could be at tad overboard.About the only thing I would blend or crush would be egg shells if you have them. The other stuff would be fine to just chopped up. You can dig a trench or hole, toss in the kitchen scraps, and then fill in the hole. If you have worms in the soil, they'll love you. The added benefit of the worms is worm casting which your plants would love. I'd also alternate where you put the kitchen scraps to spread the wealth throughout the yard.

How did you ever end up with a yard half full of sand and half full of clay?
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Charlotte, NC (Zone 7b)
kevin101
May 18, 2020 6:55 PM CST
thommesM said:

How did you ever end up with a yard half full of sand and half full of clay?


Close to the house is compact clay. Further away from house is sandy.

Instead of digging holes or trenches, can I just mix in the top few inches of soil?

Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 19, 2020 3:07 AM CST
Typically the reason for burying scraps is varmint control. I haven't blended the scraps up into a liquid before adding kitchen scraps to the garden. If you aren't worried about attracting raccoons, mice, rats, other critters that I'm not thinking of, you could try it and see what happens.
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
May 19, 2020 7:33 AM CST
Typical soil as the foundation dig turns up clay and they just pile it back around the house.
Kitchen scraps are very wet and should decompose or be eaten quickly. Drying them first is too much work, even counterproductive, I'd say.
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Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
May 19, 2020 7:39 AM CST
I've heard from a lot of older people who said their mamma told them to bury the scraps in the garden. They didn't call it composting back then, they called it doing their chores. Of course, they had beautiful gardens. Hilarious!
There's been a revival for this kind of composting. Called composting in place, it says to bury it in holes or dig shallow trenches and put it there. If your garden is big enough, I'm guessing it would be ok. You don't use that area until the next year. Because I garden primarily in raised beds and pots, I compost in a pile.
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Name: Christie
Central Ohio 43016 (Zone 6a)
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cwhitt
May 19, 2020 8:17 AM CST
I often throw my coffee grounds and banana peels right on the soil. It will still compost. The only thing you need to be careful about is that some stuff will attract rodents or fungus gnats. Melon, for instance. In those cases, throw some soil on top of it for best results.
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Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
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gardenfish
May 19, 2020 8:22 AM CST
Melons really attract flies. I always bury these deep in the pile. No problem with rodents, I have plenty of outside cats in the neighborhood.
“ Be kind whenever possible”
14th Dalai Lama
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
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sallyg
May 19, 2020 9:57 AM CST
Coffee grounds right on the soil, it looks like nice dirt anyway. But coffee filters are more persistent, bury those or they blow around.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)

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