Houseplants forum→Monstera turning yellow after repotting

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VeCo
May 20, 2020 5:54 AM CST
At the end of February I bought a monstera deliciosa, which was a fairly big plant. I tried not to overwater her so in the beginning I didn't give her a lot of water, but this led to two yellowing leafs on the bottom. I contacted the gardening center where I got her and they told me not to worry too much about this if she still produced new growth. And since she produced one new leaf I didn't pay much attention to it. But I watered her a bit more to make sure she wouldn't completely dry out.

Now fast forward to a few days ago. I saw my monstera was getting a new leaf (her first one since I contacted the gardening center) but the tip of it was brown/black and I immediately looked for other signs of root rot. I noticed that a few leafs were yellowing a bit and I saw some questionnable dark spots.
So I decided to take the plant out of the pot and I discovered that it were in fact 5 seperate plants. So I divided them to have a bigger chance that at least some of them would survive.

I saw some bad roots (in a really early stage of root rot, since most of them looked healthy) and cut them off. I cleaned the roots and let them dry for a day. I then repotted them in a mixture of universal potting soil and perlite. And following online advice for repotting I gave them a bit of water to help the roots settle.

So today I noticed that a lot of leafs are turning yellow and the potting soil doesn't seem to dry out. Any advice of what my next step should be? Should I let the plants recover from the repotting shock and let the potting soil dry out in the next few weeks? Or should I repot them again?
Thumb of 2020-05-20/VeCo/dc94da
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 20, 2020 8:34 AM CST
When plants are overwatered or left in wet soil for a long time, the roots will suffocate due to lack of oxygen. This is commonly referred to as root rot. The impulse is to remove all the wet soil and replace it with dry soil. However, that is a mistake because removing soil also tears away many of the tiny root hairs that do most of the work and that is often fatal to the plant. At best, the plant sheds many older leaves while it tries to recover.

It is very difficult to advise you going forward because proper watering is critical and that depends on how much damage was done to the roots, the size of the new pot, the porosity of the new soil and your ability to find the right balance between providing the roots with enough water but also letting the soil dry out enough so the roots also get oxygen.

Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

VeCo
May 20, 2020 9:43 AM CST
Thank you very much for your answer!

Do you think that taking cuttings of the non-affected stems and rooting them in water will be an option so I don't lose the whole plant?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 20, 2020 10:41 AM CST
Yes, that is a good idea because its future is a bit sketchy as this time. A short-stemmed tip cutting will root most readily.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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