Avatar for peacelilyqueen
May 22, 2020 1:30 PM CST
Tennessee
Hello!


I've had this Peace Lily for about a year now. It's been healthy and happy. I noticed that the ends of its leaves were really brown and dried out, but otherwise healthy. So I repotted it to see if the leaf-damage would stop. Now, all of the stems are droopy, but the leaves are not withering. I tried watering it to see if the "droopiness" would improve, but I actually started seeing yellow leaves as though it was being over-watered AND it's still droopy.

Any advice on how to make him happy again?!


Thanks!




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Last edited by peacelilyqueen May 26, 2020 9:34 AM Icon for preview
Avatar for oneeyeluke
May 23, 2020 1:20 AM CST
Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Quitter's never Win
Birds Cat Lover Dog Lover Hummingbirder Organic Gardener
You are keeping the soil too wet, let the soil dry out almost completely before watering.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
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May 23, 2020 1:24 AM CST
Name: Sue Taylor
Northumberland, UK
Amaryllis Region: United Kingdom Houseplants Frogs and Toads Foliage Fan I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Container Gardener Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Annuals Bee Lover
Repotting is highly likely to be the kiss of death for so many peace lilies. It does more harm than good in most cases, especially if the roots are disturbed or it's been put into too big a pot which can cause root rot.
Do you have a photo?
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May 23, 2020 8:15 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
I agree with Sue. When you repotted, how much of the original soil did you remove and replace?
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Avatar for peacelilyqueen
May 26, 2020 9:30 AM CST
Tennessee
The new pot was 14.055-inches wide from a 10-inch pot. I added a lot of new soil. Today, I tried to remove the new, brand name soil, and replace it with more of the soil that the plant originally thrived in. Is there any way I can save it? I'm afraid it may have caused root rot and I'm not sure how to fix that.
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May 26, 2020 9:36 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
If you removed a good portion of the original soil when you repotted, then you also inadvertently damaged many of the tiny roothairs that do most of the work. The excessively large pot then further damaged the remaining roots by suffocating them.

I am not optimistic about its recovery. Keep it in a the smallest pot that the renaining roots fit into snugly.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
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