Greenhouses forum→Attached Greenhouse "Covers" House Window?

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Virginia Beach (Zone 8a)
CaptObvious
May 22, 2020 2:53 PM CST
Am I completely insane to design an attached greenhouse that covers a bedroom window or two. The best place for my greenhouse appears to be attached to the end of the house where there are two bedroom windows. The house wall will serve as the "north" wall of the greenhouse and won't be modified. Afterwards, one could enter the greenhouse from the bedroom window, but one would be in really big trouble to do so (except in a fire emergency). There's other bedroom windows in the room that exit thr front of the house.
Name: Jim
Northeast Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
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MoonShadows
May 23, 2020 3:14 AM CST
I don't consider it insane. I actually like the idea. Think of the added warmth you will get in the bedroom when opening one of your windows. Also, imagine replacing one of your windows with a door so you can walk right out of your bedroom into your greenhouse.

I actually wanted to build a greenhouse on the deck outside our dining room French doors. Like you, the wall of the dining room would have been the north wall. Unfortunately, a contractor told me the deck would not support the added enclosed greenhouse structure.
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BruceM2
May 24, 2020 1:15 PM CST
I'm not as cavalier about enthusiasm for an attached greenhouse on bedrooms or lack of fresh air for the bedrooms. Greenhouse air is typically very high humidity, rich in soil mold and bacteria. Mold and algae growing on greenhouse walls is often reported here. Water streams down my friend's greenhouse walls in winter. For some with allergies or chronic diseases (typically autoimmune), this might be a very bad idea. Under windows, in the framing and insulation is where most home mold is found, from window condensation. The good news is the greenhouse will protect the window from cold. The bad news- that section of wall will now be exposed to higher humidity year round and may never get a chance to dry out to the outside (air movement and transpiration). This is very climate dependent, and also, if the house has central AC that is run often, the bedroom window walls may be kept dryer through that, assuming there's no vapor barrier behind the drywall which will largely stop transpiration.

Just saying, think it through, perhaps check to see if anyone has done this in your climate, and give priority to family member's health. We tend to not value it until it is affected badly.

I'd also note that the solid north wall is the absolutely cheapest wall in a greenhouse.

PS- I have no experience with your Virgina Beach climate, though I must say by the stats it looks lovely. I don't see any months with low humidity, which concerns me about mold in the proposed shared wall. Local experience would be a real big help.


[Last edited by BruceM2 - May 24, 2020 3:02 PM (+)]
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Virginia Beach (Zone 8a)
CaptObvious
May 31, 2020 7:09 PM CST
BruceM2 said:I'm not as cavalier about enthusiasm for an attached greenhouse on bedrooms or lack of fresh air for the bedrooms. Greenhouse air is typically very high humidity, rich in soil mold and bacteria. Mold and algae growing on greenhouse walls is often reported here. Water streams down my friend's greenhouse walls in winter. For some with allergies or chronic diseases (typically autoimmune), this might be a very bad idea. Under windows, in the framing and insulation is where most home mold is found, from window condensation. The good news is the greenhouse will protect the window from cold. The bad news- that section of wall will now be exposed to higher humidity year round and may never get a chance to dry out to the outside (air movement and transpiration). This is very climate dependent, and also, if the house has central AC that is run often, the bedroom window walls may be kept dryer through that, assuming there's no vapor barrier behind the drywall which will largely stop transpiration.

Just saying, think it through, perhaps check to see if anyone has done this in your climate, and give priority to family member's health. We tend to not value it until it is affected badly.

I'd also note that the solid north wall is the absolutely cheapest wall in a greenhouse.

PS- I have no experience with your Virgina Beach climate, though I must say by the stats it looks lovely. I don't see any months with low humidity, which concerns me about mold in the proposed shared wall. Local experience would be a real big help.



Yeah, the more I think about it, the more I'm convinced that it's not the best place for the greenhouse, attached or detached, because of its orientation SW. I want it for a late winter early spring house. Would't expect to use it in the summer.

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