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May 22, 2020 7:53 PM CST
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Cat Lover Ferns Peppers
Roses Sedums Sempervivums
Well, it might be nice to see what Euphorbia from Madagascar are available and I will
hope they stay relatively small so they will go into the bowl conveniently and compatibly
I guess I need to look at Euphorbia from Madagascar

I am going to add what I know about my favorite vendors. Would any of these work?
I left out all of the Echeveria
Mountain Crest Gardens has these plants available:
what is a Crassula x perforata
Crassula 'Springtime' (a cultivar of rupestris)
Haworthia coarctata f. greenii
Crassula congesta
what is a Pachyveria 'Noel'
what is a Pachyveria 'Haagei
Haworthia limifolia var. ubomboensis

Planet Desert:
Haworthia truncate var maughanii
Haworthia veneosa tessellate
Parodia penicillate
Euphorbia viguieri ankarafantsiensis
Adenia glauca
Mediolobivia rosalviflora pygmaea
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
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May 22, 2020 8:00 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers
Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Garden Ideas: Level 1
Willinator said:Would any of these work?


Possibly:

Euphorbia viguieri ankarafantsiensis
Adenia glauca

But the Adenia really doesn't tolerate cool temperatures very well.

Willinator said:what is a Crassula x perforata


Probably this

String of Buttons (Crassula perforata)

The Crassulas and Pachyverias enjoy standard succulent care, not the more frequent summer water your Pachypodium & Euphorbia do. Haworthias are dry growing plants and they like the soil to go dry on a regular basis, as do the cacti on your list.
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May 22, 2020 8:10 PM CST
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Cat Lover Ferns Peppers
Roses Sedums Sempervivums
Well that is one thing that I can somewhat control. The schedule for watering can
be adjusted so it would only be the level of humidity which the plants have to deal
with and I have grown other Crassulas and would like to possibly try Pachyverias
I am growing several types of Haworthia and some have even thrown up bloom stalks.
So I can make sure the plants get dry so far as watering goes.

I can grow a lot of these plants on the deck where they only get water when they need
to be watered. I can also give them partial sun/shade on the deck.

And since I have already taken care of the bowl with the now 3 plants in it.
I guess I could ask about Echevaria also.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Last edited by Willinator May 22, 2020 8:15 PM Icon for preview
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May 22, 2020 8:28 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers
Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Garden Ideas: Level 1
I'm sorry, I thought you were asking for plants that would be compatible with the Pachypodium and Euphorbia you have potted together. Let me try to be more helpful in general.

Of the 4 Haworthias you listed, the first two will grow much faster than the last two. They are all clumping plants (so plan for offsets down the road) but some reproduce more quickly than others. I am a big fan of the Haworthias though their flowers tend to be pretty bland. They tolerate drought very well and do not require a lot of pot space. When in doubt, put them in a more protected location. So not full sun, more like part sun or filtered light, definitely strong light but not full blasting overhead sun.

The two Pachyverias you have listed are hybrids between a Pachyphytum and an Echeveria. They tend to be powder dusted and the flowers are interesting, sort of fleshy because of the inflated sepals. I am not familiar with the cultivars listed. These plants require the same care as Echeverias and they tend to resent really high temperatures.

The Adenia is an interesting plant because of its flask-shaped or globose caudex (to ~2 feet). Info from the Pachyforms book (which I highly recommend): apparently best grown in warm greenhouses, must be kept above 50°F (ideally above 60°F) during winter, with daytime highs in the low 70s if possible.
Last edited by Baja_Costero May 22, 2020 8:51 PM Icon for preview
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May 22, 2020 9:13 PM CST
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Sempervivums Bromeliad Adeniums Bookworm Sedums
Tropicals Fruit Growers Foliage Fan Orchids Bulbs Apples
Parodia penicilata, a small globular cactus, with straights spines and red flowers. Since it is of the "original" parodia species(not from notocactus and eriocactus), it likes it slightly drier, and in partial shade...
The crassulla spring time is a small succulent plant, thick green leaves, clumping. It blooms, and doesnt do much else. Had grown this plant, never did anything interesting...
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May 23, 2020 12:11 AM CST
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Cat Lover Ferns Peppers
Roses Sedums Sempervivums
Yes, I am trying to be more general right now because I already added another Pachypodium to the bowl with
the Euphorbia and other Pachypodium.

I have a couple of bowls that I need to add plants to so I will look at any that are available to determine if it would be a
good fit.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
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