Ask a Question forum→My Monstera Plant is Dying - Please Help

Views: 224, Replies: 7 » Jump to the end
New York
sharmander236
May 24, 2020 6:56 PM CST
Hi there. I'm new the community, but hoping to get some help on a Monstera plant. I've had this plant for about 3 months - purchased it from a local grocery store. It was located in a darker area in my house, but recently, I started noticing some issues (brown spots on leaves, new leaf coming in with brown spots and stunted), so I moved it to a lighter area with SE exposure (about a few weeks ago). I've been watering about once a week - giving it a dunk in a shower, submerging for 30 seconds, and then letting it dry. I thought a few weeks ago it could be root rot, so I repotted to investigate the roots - didn't see any brown/mushy roots, and used MiracleGro fertilizer during repotting - but the brown spots have been getting worse. The only saving grace is the new leaf coming in looks pretty good, but I'm afraid I may have to give up on this plant.



Thumb of 2020-05-25/sharmander236/6a5bda
Thumb of 2020-05-25/sharmander236/b1e4a9


Thumb of 2020-05-25/sharmander236/d4af01


Thumb of 2020-05-25/sharmander236/6a9e59




Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Quitter's never Win
Hummingbirder Birds Organic Gardener Dog Lover Cat Lover
oneeyeluke
May 25, 2020 12:57 AM CST
You have fertilizer problem and a over watering problem. You never need to add fertilizer to any plant that's in new soil because all new soil mixes have a nutrient charge in them.
When you transplanted your plant into a larger container you raise the water volume in the soil and that caused your plant to hold too much water in the roots. Allow the soil to dry out about 2 inches on top before watering again.
Please don't submerge your plant under water because that cuts off all the oxygen in the roots and suffocates the plant.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 25, 2020 10:03 AM CST
Limited leaf edge spotting is a common problem that might be caused by inadequate light or a minor watering problem. In any case, replacing the soil and repotting was not warranted for such a minor problem and may now result in more serious issues. The repotting probably did some damage to the tiny root hairs that you may not have even noticed.

How much larger is the new pot or did you use the same pot?

How much of the original soil did you replace?

What kind of soil did you use?

Please post a photo that shows the way it is now potted.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
New York
sharmander236
May 25, 2020 11:43 AM CST
Thank you all so much for your help!

WillC, thank you for your insight. I'm afraid you're probably right. Like I said, my monstera was placed in an area that was slightly darker until the brown spots began to appear. I had heard that the most likely cause was root rot - I probably overreacted in repotting Sad

In regards to the pot, I used the same one, as I found no evidence of root rot. I replaced all the soil, using MiracleGro potting soil. Would you recommend another? I'm including a picture that shows the current planter.

OneeyeLuke, thanks as well! You're probably right regarding fertilizer - looking back, I was so concerned, I threw in everything but the kitchen sink. Regarding the pot size, I used the same pot in the repotting process. I will keep that in mind regarding watering - I didn't take the roots not receiving oxygen into consideration. But is this true even for a short submersion, say 10-15 seconds? I started watering my plants like this as I had read it's also a good way to reduce water retention in plants (when you dunk them, and rapidly remove them from the water), but I'll certainly stop if it's drowning them.


Thumb of 2020-05-25/sharmander236/724a79

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 25, 2020 1:01 PM CST
Removing and replacing soil is one of the most stressful things you can do to an indoor plant because it also removes most of the tiny root hairs that do most of the work. As a result, it is now a much greater candidate for root rot than it was before.

Remove any soil you added to the top of the roots when you repotted as that soil prevents oxygen from penetrating the root zone readily and makes it harder to determine when to water. The uppermost roots should be just barely covered with soil. Then, allow the top inch of the remaining soil to feel dry before watering.

The hard part is determining how much water to add at each watering. You want the top inch of the soil to get dry again in about a week so you will have to adjust the amount of water you add so that happens. It will take a bit of experimentation and careful monitoring on your part until you are able to make that determination of how much water it uses each week.

Crossing Fingers!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
New York
sharmander236
Jun 2, 2020 11:17 AM CST
Thanks @WillC. I've taken your advice, and removed some of the potting soil. After that, I waited to the soil thoroughly dried to water it again, and it looks like its perked up. I just wanted to share some more photos - would you be able to confirm if this repotting looks good? I'm nervous I've removed too much soil, so there are too many roots poking above the soil, but perhaps those are aerial roots?

One additional question: where I cut off one leaves that are damaged, it looks like a new stem/leaf is re-sprouting. Very exciting! Anything I can do to help these guys along? And are those stems or leaves?

Thanks so much, I don't want to give up on this monstera yet, its fighting so hard to stay alive!
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/a29377
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/1f8f7d
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/bc8282
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/895d89
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/c19ee2
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/ed573c
Thumb of 2020-06-02/sharmander236/a3f60b

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 2, 2020 5:16 PM CST
You've done a good job removing the excess soil. Those exposed roots have previously developed a protective covering so they are fine. I now suggest that you water through when the top half to three-quarters inch of remaining soil feels dry to the touch.

It looks like new leaf growth coming in. Provide your usual good care and the new growth will do fine.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
New York
sharmander236
Jun 2, 2020 5:42 PM CST
Thanks so much for your help @willc! Fingers crossed for my monstera. I'll keep you updated.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Agastache"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.