Ask a Question forum→Please help indoor pest problem :( already lost my ivy

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Minnesota
christwendt
May 25, 2020 6:57 PM CST
I had an ivy becomes extremely unhappy and started getting sticky. I'm new to this plant stuff but this is my first hurdle. I have had most things for a year but 2 months ago I added a few monstera. Anyway Bachman's confirmed my ivy had scales and said it was not worth saving. I'm sad but then it got me thinking about the plants I have that were close to my ivy.. they have been looking unhappy recently but I didn't think anything of it (droopy, yellow leaves, holes in new growth in monstera) and I examined them. My questions now... I have a Chinese money plant , jade, monstera , and Bonsai that were all close.
Are these photos demonstrating scales ?
Did I get the right products ? Any other reccomendations please. I don't want to lose these plants they make me so happy Sad
Last but not least. When treating these how far apart do they have to be? I live in a small studio where my one window is where all my plants are.


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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 26, 2020 10:02 AM CST
There is no sign of scale or any other insect pest in any of the photos you posted. None of them need or should be treated with the products you showed.

If your plants appear to be struggling, it is for reasons other than pests.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
May 26, 2020 10:26 AM CST
Hi christwendt, Welcome!

I don't see any signs of pests in your photos either. Yellow, drooping leaves can be due to conditions of the soil retaining too much water, or too little water. If you can upload photos showing each entire plant we can get a better idea of exactly which plant you have and advise on proper culture conditions. Photos showing the containers and soil will help determine possibly issues.

I don't see a Monstera in any of your pictures but juvenile leaves of Monstera deliciosa are heart shaped, with the slits and holes forming as the leaves mature.


It's also normal for Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera adansonii) to have holes in the leaves

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Minnesota
christwendt
May 26, 2020 6:56 PM CST
WillC said:There is no sign of scale or any other insect pest in any of the photos you posted. None of them need or should be treated with the products you showed.

If your plants appear to be struggling, it is for reasons other than pests.

Hi can you explain what this brown stuff is then that's growing on the stem of the plant that is normally flesh green? Because my ivy that was clearly dying and was sticky the plant store said had scales and was not worth saving. Here are better pics. I have no idea what is going on with the new growth on my monstera. I have good drainage (holes, rock bottom , carbon on top of that , perlite in soil ). They are east facing and everything else looks healthy. I just admit my plants don't seem to be struggling but neither did my ivy until one day it was super sticky with sap. Also the pic of my jade plant with the brown spot, that is the leaf not the stem. The leaves I know should not she this brown globs.


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[Last edited by christwendt - May 26, 2020 6:57 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2252943 (4)
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
May 27, 2020 5:58 AM CST
christwendt said:I have good drainage (holes, rock bottom , carbon on top of that , perlite in soil ).

When you say "rock bottom" do you mean that you have rocks on top of the drainage holes? Using a pot with holes in the bottom for drainage is important but placing pebbles, rocks or broken crock shards into the bottom of the pot will actually hinder proper drainage.

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 27, 2020 8:13 AM CST
It is good to be vigilant, but try not to overreact to the prior scale infestation. The brown strip in the first photo is normal plant tissue. The brown spot in the second photo is a scab from the healing of a slightly damaged leaf. It is not a disease or a pest.

We can't help you with your Monstera without seeing a photo that shows the entire plant and its pot.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Minnesota
christwendt
May 27, 2020 8:57 AM CST
WillC said:It is good to be vigilant, but try not to overreact to the prior scale infestation. The brown strip in the first photo is normal plant tissue. The brown spot in the second photo is a scab from the healing of a slightly damaged leaf. It is not a disease or a pest.

We can't help you with your Monstera without seeing a photo that shows the entire plant and its pot.


Minnesota
christwendt
May 27, 2020 8:59 AM CST
plantladylin said:Hi christwendt, Welcome!

I don't see any signs of pests in your photos either. Yellow, drooping leaves can be due to conditions of the soil retaining too much water, or too little water. If you can upload photos showing each entire plant we can get a better idea of exactly which plant you have and advise on proper culture conditions. Photos showing the containers and soil will help determine possibly issues.

I don't see a Monstera in any of your pictures but juvenile leaves of Monstera deliciosa are heart shaped, with the slits and holes forming as the leaves mature.


It's also normal for Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera adansonii) to have holes in the leaves

I'm aware of the holes in the leaves. Here are photos of my plants. Sorry been having issues uploading photos currently on vacation.




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Minnesota
christwendt
May 27, 2020 9:01 AM CST
plantladylin said:
When you say "rock bottom" do you mean that you have rocks on top of the drainage holes? Using a pot with holes in the bottom for drainage is important but placing pebbles, rocks or broken crock shards into the bottom of the pot will actually hinder proper drainage.


Yea I mean on the bottom of the pot I have small layer of rocks. I read that was good for keeping the roots out of water. It seems to drain plenty still and I don't have signs of overwatering / under watering. Just new damages leaves that look like something is eating it possible ? I added more photos.

Minnesota
christwendt
May 27, 2020 9:01 AM CST
WillC said:It is good to be vigilant, but try not to overreact to the prior scale infestation. The brown strip in the first photo is normal plant tissue. The brown spot in the second photo is a scab from the healing of a slightly damaged leaf. It is not a disease or a pest.

We can't help you with your Monstera without seeing a photo that shows the entire plant and its pot.

I added more photos.

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 27, 2020 9:06 AM CST
Your first plant is a Pothos, the second is a Chinese Money Plant, and the third is a Jade. There is nothing unusual about any of them. Plants are never perfect and do develop some minor flaws and blemishes.

Putting stones in the bottom of pots is an outdated practice that serves no purpose. As long as a pot had a drain hole water will drain out just fine.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
[Last edited by WillC - May 27, 2020 9:07 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2253431 (11)
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
May 27, 2020 10:50 AM CST
I see no Monstera in your photos; here are our database entries for your plants:
Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
Chinese Money Plant (Pilea peperomioides)
Jade Plant (Crassula ovata)

Your plants all appear fine at present but I feel you may eventually have issues if you keep a layer of rocks in the bottom of the pots. Studies have shown that placing pebbles into the bottom of a pot actually impedes proper aeration and drainage at root level. Unless it is an aquatic plant, you don't want roots to remain saturated or they will suffocate and rot.

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


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