All Things Gardening forum→Tricky garden design challenge....

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Cosmic258
May 26, 2020 1:11 PM CST
We are renovating a house with a lovely sized garden, but unfortunately with an ugly concrete path running around the perimeter. We can't remove the path as underpinning will be required and we can't afford it.

We are looking for inspiration as to how to hide the path (or embrace it!) for a modern garden. To make the design a little trickier we are laying a patio where the path will be 2/3 feet higher. Please see pics- the patio edge will be where the wooden edging is, give or take.

We were thinking of vertical, staggered height sleepers, but the height of the path/ground there will still need to come down to meet the rest of the lawn which will be levelled out.

Help!

Thank you :)
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Name: Debra
Garland, TX (NE Dallas suburb) (Zone 8a)
Service dogs: Angels with paws.
Dragonflies Dog Lover Bookworm I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Photography Bee Lover
Plays in the sandbox Butterflies Region: Texas Garden Sages I sent a postcard to Randy! Charter ATP Member
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lovemyhouse
May 26, 2020 1:27 PM CST
Does the concrete butt up to the rock wall? And are those holes in the wall drain(s) from the higher-level neighbor's yard?
It’s okay to not know all the answers.
Name: Deb
Planet Earth (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Bonehead
May 26, 2020 1:32 PM CST
I would embrace the old concrete. It's kind of cool looking. Maybe plant on either side of it to create a bit of a 'hidden pathway' and place some benches and/or pockets of garden art here and there to break up the straight lines If your neighbor's drainage accomodates it, maybe add a water garden here and there.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.

Cosmic258
May 26, 2020 1:50 PM CST
lovemyhouse said:Does the concrete butt up to the rock wall? And are those holes in the wall drain(s) from the higher-level neighbor's yard?


Mostly, yes. There is 10" or so space between the very end of the path and wall but it butts up to actual wall about 2m in. Yes holes are drainage...

Cosmic258
May 26, 2020 1:51 PM CST
Bonehead said:I would embrace the old concrete. It's kind of cool looking. Maybe plant on either side of it to create a bit of a 'hidden pathway' and place some benches and/or pockets of garden art here and there to break up the straight lines If your neighbor's drainage accomodates it, maybe add a water garden here and there.


We did think that and probably will in other areas, it's just the bit that runs alongside the patio and is higher then the patio which is really difficult...
Name: Debra
Garland, TX (NE Dallas suburb) (Zone 8a)
Service dogs: Angels with paws.
Dragonflies Dog Lover Bookworm I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Photography Bee Lover
Plays in the sandbox Butterflies Region: Texas Garden Sages I sent a postcard to Randy! Charter ATP Member
Image
lovemyhouse
May 26, 2020 3:11 PM CST
Probably be a good idea to keep any plant or container to either side of each drain (she says stating the obvious Big Grin ). The concrete looks like it would make for uneven footing, so the idea of using it as a ledge might be safer. If there is a section of available dirt between the base of the wall and the inside edge of the concrete, you could try trailing or cascading plants. They would cover the concrete as they spill over toward the patio. Depending on your growing zone and the amount of light, an example you could try is Cascading Rosemary (I have 'Irene' and it is a workhorse.) Short Clematis would be perfect, too.

If you don't mind annuals, something like Petunias or Sweet Potato Vine would be colorful and cover a good amount of space.

A few large containers could be spaced along the path between the in-ground perennials. Unless your winters are particularly cold, (thornless!)Roses, Irises, Daylilies, Clematis, a dwarf Pomegranate--each would fare well in a big pot.

Would you be interested in espalier plants? I know it is work, but the path end close to your house looks plenty tall enough to accommodate all kinds of trees or shrubs like Bay and Camellia, or Dwarf fruit trees. A climbing Rose with bright pink blooms like Zephirine Drouhin would be gorgeous against that dark stone, it smells wonderful and is thornless, too.
It’s okay to not know all the answers.
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
May 27, 2020 11:21 PM CST
I think it looks like it will be fabulous and not at all difficult! Your decisions really rest on picking plants appropriate for the sun Exposure and choosing perennials vs annuals.. do you like futzing in the garden In May or do you want it to take care of itself?
The plural of anecdote is not data.

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