Post a reply

Avatar for thedirtysalad
May 26, 2020 10:43 PM CST

Hi all...
Fairly new to vegetable gardening, and with the current state of affairs- I got a VERY late start planting my seeds in for this year.
Any advice on the best time to plant my seed potatoes for my crop that I want for winter storage. What's the latest that I can get them in the ground, and still hope for a somewhat decent late fall/early winter crop? I'm in zone 6, and quite often- we can have a very late fall.

Thanks in advance!
Image
May 27, 2020 7:01 AM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
zone 6...
please tell us what state you are in...

while taters aren't going to grow through the heat of a southern summer... autumn planting is a possibility...

turnips would do better with an august planting.... taters... just not a good southern crop...

Why not consider sweet potatoes?
or jicama?
or jerusalem artichoke?

there are a number of squash that you could try....
Last edited by stone May 27, 2020 7:02 AM Icon for preview
Avatar for thedirtysalad
May 27, 2020 7:37 AM CST

I'm in Massachusetts. Turnips might also be a good idea.
Image
May 27, 2020 8:38 AM CST
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level
Massachusetts, You may some success with June planting and late September harvest. As a kid in Virginia we double cropped potatoes. First planting in March. Second planting in early July. Of course we used short season varieties like Early Rose and Irish Cobbler. Long season varieties would not work well.
Avatar for thedirtysalad
May 27, 2020 4:07 PM CST

Makes sense.
Thank you both for your advice. Smiling
Last edited by thedirtysalad May 27, 2020 9:27 PM Icon for preview
Image
May 28, 2020 1:34 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
yeah... mass... here I was thinking tn... memphis... nashville...

Zone 6 tells us a lot less than you'd think.

I don't know how hot your summers are, but something tells me that they would feel positively Spring-like to me...

The thing about an autumn planting to remember is that a hard frost will burn the plants back to the ground... maybe with a row cover?

or... as Dillard suggests, maybe it won't get hot enough to kill the potato plants if you go ahead and plant.

At my house... I'm still planting beans and cow peas in september...

and in october last year, we were still getting 100 degree days... put my autumn planting way back...

never did get turnips from my turnip planting... they bolted before even forming the root.

I am getting nice kale, though.
Avatar for thedirtysalad
May 29, 2020 12:20 AM CST

Thanks for the info, Stone... you're right- I should have given more information than just my zone number. haha.
Honestly, our summers are really up and down.. definitely not like the heat you're getting, but we'll have two or three days at 90 degrees then back down into the low 80s for a few more days, then maybe another 90+ degree day. It's definitely not consistent. Same with our autumns... into the 70s most of the time- then suddenly one day it's 90 again.
Our fall season has also been starting pretty late the past few years... So, I was thinking of maybe throwing some "seeds" into some soil maybe around early July (?) or so, and see if they'll give me anything to harvest around October or November.
Image
May 29, 2020 7:13 AM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Oughta work...
Incidentally... taters actually do produce seed, and I've grown taters from those berries at the top of the plant!
Avatar for thommesM
May 29, 2020 7:20 AM CST
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
Composter
Composter
stone said:Oughta work...
Incidentally... taters actually do produce seed, and I've grown taters from those berries at the top of the plant!



Interesting. What was the days to maturity from seed?
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Image
May 29, 2020 7:24 AM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Actually, I can't answer that question... was back in my traveling days... I worked up some soil at a buddy's house, planted the seed and then (?) went to another state... on a phone call, got a grow report...
Avatar for thommesM
May 29, 2020 7:55 AM CST
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
Composter
Composter
Ah ok. I might try it. I got flowers last year, not sure I got the berries. Will have to read up on it.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Avatar for thedirtysalad
May 31, 2020 10:41 PM CST

Thanks for the info, Stone... you're right- I should have given more information than just my zone number. haha.
Honestly, our summers are really up and down.. definitely not like the heat you're getting, but we'll have two or three days at 90 degrees then back down into the low 80s for a few more days, then maybe another 90+ degree day. It's definitely not consistent. Same with our autumns... into the 70s most of the time- then suddenly one day it's 90 again.
Our fall season has also been starting pretty late the past few years... So, I was thinking of maybe throwing some "seeds" into some soil maybe around early July (?) or so, and see if they'll give me anything to harvest around October or November.
Avatar for RpR
Jun 2, 2020 1:07 PM CST
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
IF you have not, put them in the ground, do it NOW.
I am in Minn. and planted some very late last year; they sat there till late summer before popping out of the ground. (the potatoes really did not have eyes when got them)
I managed to get a small crop from them but it was weird to see potato plants growing, rather vigorously, when the rest were turning brown or were already out of the ground.
Now up here , rarely, very rarely, do you not have to have them out of the ground by Oct. due to cold, but where you are, if the ground is not too warm, that will cause problems, you should just have a very late crop depending on potato variety.
I mulch mine with leaves, a lot of, which keeps the ground moist and helps keep the ground cooler.
Last edited by RpR Jun 2, 2020 1:13 PM Icon for preview
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.
Member Login:

( No account? Join now! )

Today's site banner is by Murky and is called "Moth Orchid"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.