Ask a Question forum→Angel Wing Senecio dying..not from overwatering. WHY?!

Views: 1639, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
CA
courtney93
May 27, 2020 6:08 PM CST
Here is a headscratcher for anyone who is willing! I just recently bought the Angel Wings Senecio about a week ago. It was sitting in the bright sun and I have read up on how to take care of them. A couple of days ago I repotted it and I have a well-draining soil in there (the miracle gro cactus and succulent soil). Even still I don't think Miracle Gro drains fast enough so I recently just bought some larger particled soil so hopefully, it'll help drain it when I do water it. Anyway, it is left out in the bright sun as often as possible with no water since I haven't actually watered it until today. It's been slowly wilting since I got it ...and it looks like this. Any help from anyone would be fantastic. Because it's not dying from overwatering..obviously.
Thumb of 2020-05-28/courtney93/d71c65


Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
May 27, 2020 6:19 PM CST
Put it in bright shade or filtered light. Avoid direct overhead sun for now. I bet it recovers just fine. Be sure to wait for the soil to go dry or nearly dry at depth (not just at the surface) before watering. Once your plant turns the corner and starts doing better, you can dial up the sun again, little by little over the course of weeks. Be aware that the sun is close to its annual maximum right now, so we're experiencing extra intense rays coming from more of an overhead angle.

Welcome!
CA
courtney93
May 27, 2020 6:24 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:Put it in bright shade or filtered light. Avoid direct overhead sun for now. I bet it recovers just fine. Be sure to wait for the soil to go dry or nearly dry at depth (not just at the surface) before watering. Once your plant turns the corner and starts doing better, you can dial up the sun again, little by little over the course of weeks. Be aware that the sun is close to its annual maximum right now, so we're experiencing extra intense rays coming from more of an overhead angle.

Welcome!


Thank you so much! I will try to keep it out of bright light and see if it recovers. As far as the soil goes should I repot it once I get the bigger soil or just wait and see what happens?
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
May 27, 2020 6:52 PM CST
I would leave it where it is.
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
May 27, 2020 9:19 PM CST
STOP REPOTTING
(sorry to shout, this is an edit because Baja righteously chided me in the next post. Repotting a mistake I made many times years ago, and I wish someone had said it to me this forcefully).

I never repot A new plant or an an unhealthy plant...
only ever repot a blazing happy so big it's about to tip over and it's the start of the growing season. If all three of those things are not happening- I Do NOT repot

I say that so forcefully because if you have a plant that is struggling, repotting will damage some roots and also result in a very different humidity profile inside the pot Substrate .. the rootball you had is now insulated with more dirt, so it will stay moist longer and if roots have been injured, rot is very likely. If your plant needs and your plant care are not balanced right now, it's likely repotting with exacerbate rather than solve the issue.
The plural of anecdote is not data.
[Last edited by Turbosaurus - May 27, 2020 10:49 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2254361 (5)
Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
CPPgardener
May 27, 2020 10:13 PM CST
I agree

So well put I wish I had said it!!
You go Paula!
“That which is, is.That which happens, happens.” Douglas Adams
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
May 27, 2020 10:35 PM CST
There's no need to shout (all caps)... I think people will get the message with regular text.

I would disagree with Paula's main point. A succulent, if grown right, should be filling its pot at the time of purchase, and ready for a new one (if it will continue to grow bigger, that is). I would not hesitate to repot any new plant if that's the case. Take your time, assess the situation carefully, and then take action if necessary. A succulent grower should be looking to maximize the size of the plant relative to the size of the pot, which by definition means the root space starts to become limiting around the time of sale. Now that's not always the case, and people do like to cut corners when they can get away with it, but this is my experience and it would be my goal as a grower.

I think there is some general suspicion and doubt out there about repotting succulents, which is generally out of place in my opinion, and fueled by some irrational fear that there is some harm that will come from moving a succulent to a bigger container. It's still May, after all, which is plenty early in the growing season (and that season is year round in many parts of coastal CA, as it is here). Just make sure the steps you take are small (no huge pots right away), like 1-2" at a time. Use containers that are wider than deep (or underfill them otherwise), use soil that drains quickly, and most importantly wait a few days to a week after repotting to water for the first time. The number one mistake with repotting is to water immediately afterwards, which is not usually a good idea with succulents, and an especially bad one if you've handled and/or broken the roots a lot.

The container in the original post looks like a perfect size for the size of the plant... if there is an inch or so around the edges of the root ball, it will have space to grow.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - May 27, 2020 10:43 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2254438 (7)
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Image
Turbosaurus
May 27, 2020 10:55 PM CST
Baja, you saw the picture of this plant.
Are you really suggesting repotting might help? Even a little?
The plural of anecdote is not data.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
May 27, 2020 10:58 PM CST
No, I'm saying the repot that Courtney already did is fine, was probably a good idea, and is something I would generally recommend for new succulents if they have filled their pot and have potential to grow bigger. I have already said that I don't think a second repot will help.

More on the subject here...

The thread "Repotting your new succulent" in Gardening Ideas forum
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - May 27, 2020 10:58 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2254452 (9)

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by Baja_Costero and is called "Heart of darkness"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.