Ask a Question forum→What is this? Thousands of bright yellow eggs in garden bed

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Sydney
simonnamalki
May 27, 2020 9:10 PM CST
I have no idea what these are - and I just noticed them today.

I recently topped up my garden bed with sugarcane mulch, manure and potting mix.

Can someone please let me know what this is, and what I should do about it? I recently threw in some vegetable and herb seeds and was looking forward to using the bed as a vegetable garden. I have three other beds where I used the same mixture, but I can't see any of the yellow eggs things in those...

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Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
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tofitropic
May 27, 2020 9:23 PM CST
Those are fungi, perhaps some sort of jelly baby group family Leotiaceae... like Bisporella sp?
Sydney
simonnamalki
May 27, 2020 10:06 PM CST
tofitropic said:Those are fungi, perhaps some sort of jelly baby group family Leotiaceae... like Bisporella sp?


I've just had a look - it could potentially be bisporella. Is it harmful? I want to grow veggies here. How can I get rid of it?
Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
Peppers Vegetable Grower Butterflies Garden Procrastinator Roses Bookworm
Tomato Heads Tropicals Salvias Plays in the sandbox Frogs and Toads Fruit Growers
Image
tofitropic
May 27, 2020 10:32 PM CST
They are not harmful, actually they help in decomposing organic materials, wich then will fertilized the soil. Their presence indicated lots of moisture and many un-decomposed organic materials. For most of mature plants, this will be of no problem, and as the organic material decomposed, the fungi will disappear. However fungi produced and released enzyme to digest their substrate during fermentation as well as some other side product such as alcohols, and that could affect some "tender" plant especially seedlings.
The presence of un-decomposed organic substance will also invite many other kinds of fungi, bacterias and bugs, this in many cases will be not good for seedlings... These is among the reason people start seedling in a compost free medium. but if you want to grow an established (grown) plant.. it could be just fine.
If the fungi really dominant, then, raking the soil will make it more airy and dry faster, this will reduced fungi population. Also avoid watering to much, the last effort if needed, is to remove excess of un-decomposed organic bits such as wood chips or leaves litters, while the use of fungicide is only advisable in an urgent situation.

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