Cactus and Succulents forum→Hello from Willinator, What about adding these succulents

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Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
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Willinator
May 28, 2020 9:12 AM CST
Hello everyone,

Well I am expecting to receive the following plants which supposedly will not do well here in Houston, TX
especially when the summer heat arrives. Echevaria peacockii, Echevaria lilacina. Should I consider getting
some other plants and how will they do in Houston, TX when the summer heat arrives. Here is a list:
Succulents
Crassula rupestris 'Springtime'
Faucaria feline 'Tiger Jaws'
Crassula ciliate
Kalanchoe tomentosa 'Black Tie'
Delosperma lehmannii "Ice Plant"


Cacti
Mammillaria elongate 'Copper King'
Mammillaria senilis
Parodia ottonis
Gymnocalycium paraguayense f. fliescherianum
Parodia penicillate
Parodia tuberculate
Echinopsis chamaecereus

Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
May 28, 2020 9:33 AM CST
To that I say :slow down.
M.senilis, p.ottonis, the gymno, and the parodiaas are NOT beginner plants.
Some of them are called difficult, and extremely in the words of others...
Even the e. chamacereus can be problematic if youre not carefull.
Most of the succulents should be fine, save for the crassulas..
Ive had difficulty dealing with the first. The second is uncommon, and very likely is more needy...
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
May 28, 2020 9:43 AM CST

Moderator

@mcvansoest, any ideas about heat tolerance among those plants?
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
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Willinator
May 28, 2020 9:51 AM CST
I am very interested in the succulents especially and I noted that the 'Tiger Jaws' grows in zone 9a which is my zone.
So I might get these succulents. I have grown various succulents before so really it is heat tolerance. I note that the Echevarias
seem to be something to avoid so that is why I selected Crassula and the Faucaria and Kalanchoes and the Delosperma
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
[Last edited by Willinator - May 28, 2020 9:58 AM (+)]
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Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
Region: Arizona Enjoys or suffers hot summers Cactus and Succulents Xeriscape Adeniums Hybridizer
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mcvansoest
May 28, 2020 12:55 PM CST
I will refrain from commenting on the succulents, I can grow those here as annuals - from Fall to Spring - in the summer they all eventually crap out. It just gets so hot and dry here that they have a hard time surviving outside and if you bring them inside they simply do not get enough light to keep their normal forms.

I will say this about growing any CAM respiration plants in areas with crazy high night time lows, I do not know how Houston performs in summer, but here deep in the greater Phoenix heat island we invariably get 1-2 weeks where night time lows exceed 90F, usually 3-6 weeks of night time lows in the 80s... Many CAM plants simply cannot function in those kind of conditions regardless of how they perform in the day time heat, since they require the night time lows to be consistently below a certain T (which I suspect can fluctuate with the specific plant as some do a little better than others).
I know people that move their succulents inside for those periods but as said above that comes with its own set of challenges as especially in Phoenix houses are super air conditioned and generally quite dark because of window shades and screens to keep the sunlight and heat out, so making for difficult growing conditions at the other end of the spectrum.

As to the cacti: given the high humidity in Houston I would think that in the right soil and with proper adjustment to the sun - expect nursery grown plants that you get through mail order to have been grown full time in green/shade houses, depending on where the nursery is, and thus not at all used to full sun exposure - should be fine there. The main thing to keep in mind is that while you can adjust existing growth on a plant to higher sun exposure to some degree, the only real way a plant gets fully adjusted is by new growth in the sun exposure conditions that the plant is going to see long term, that is why with cacti it is really important to keep the sun orientation of a plant that has grown in certain conditions as much the same as possible, otherwise you risk severe sun burn. I hear people say, just turn your plant to a different sun exposure every so often to keep that from being an issue, and I am sure that works to some extent when the UV index is not that high, but once the UV index starts topping 8-9 on a daily basis that is pretty much untenable for cacti.

I do have to add though that for me it is difficult to grow most plants in pots in full sun just because our summer sun is so harsh (from mid May to mid July our humidity during the day times is usually <5%, so no UV shielding whatsoever, given that we rarely have cloud cover in that time as well, the UV index tends to be 10+ every day). Given enough time and patience I have been able to get some plants in pots used to ~6 hours of full sun a day, but most potted plants I grow (mostly cacti, agaves, and aloes with some random stuff sprinkled in) spent a lot of the summer either in the shade of the house, in my shade structure or under shade cloth. In the ground plants invariably do better, but usually only after long adjustment periods (some times years) requiring covering with shade cloth during the heat of summer.

One suggestion I have is to see if there are any decent local nurseries and visit them to see what they may have around. I know Texas is 'open' despite the ongoing COVID19 situation so if you are among those willing to brave going out, a visit to a nursery might be worth it, both to see what plants are available and get specific advice from growing such plant in your area. Plants already grown in more or less the same conditions have little to no adjustment period. So even finding a mail order nursery that is in conditions that are more similar to yours will help.
It is what it is!
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
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Willinator
May 28, 2020 3:53 PM CST
Well, I might just pick out some of these plants to try just for grins, I just have to decide on Cacti versus succulents? I am still wondering about the weather factor. Heat and humidity are really difficult to predict. We can get temperatures to triple digits on occasion but not often and we can
have summer days with lows of 80 F and more. So, what to do? I might order some more plants anyway and hope for the best.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson
Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
Region: Arizona Enjoys or suffers hot summers Cactus and Succulents Xeriscape Adeniums Hybridizer
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mcvansoest
May 28, 2020 4:27 PM CST
So if triple digits is a rarity and you can provide nice fast draining soils you should be able to grow those cacti you have listed in a lot of sun. Here in AZ we are probably going to be triple digits from now on till about late August... barring the occasional 98-99F day if we get a solid monsoon season.

The 10-15 degrees average high difference is huge... Also the humidity help beat down on the UV index quite a bit which also helps...
It is what it is!
Name: William Groth
Houston, TX zone 9a
Peppers Cactus and Succulents Roses Adeniums Cat Lover Sedums
Sempervivums Garden Photography
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Willinator
May 28, 2020 4:49 PM CST
I know what you mean! When I was going to school at Thunderbird Graduate School when it was
in Glendale, AZ we used to see those triple digit temperatures throughout the summer and
I remember those days. Here in Houston, TX it normally does not get that hot but it is normally
a lot more humid!
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.
Robert Louis Stevenson

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