Ask a Question forum→Dealing with jimson weed

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Manitoba, Canada
manitobagardener
May 28, 2020 7:02 PM CST
Hello! This is my first post on this forum and I'm hoping someone out there can help me! I moved into my current house with my husband 2 years ago and was blessed with a huge garden! I was very excited. When we moved in in September, we noticed these plants growing that, with some research, I eventually figured out to be jimson weed. During this research, I discovered these plants to be very poisonous and I'd love to get rid of them (although with 2 years trying, thy still grow!). What I've done the past 2 years is pick them as they sprout, but because each pod can seed up to 100 seeds, you can imagine being in the hot sun picking tiny seedlings is not my idea of fun gardening.

I guess my questions are:

1. As we suspect they acted as pest control for the previous garden owner, will leaving jimson weed in the garden harm my other plants or can it make the vegetables toxic as well?
2. When can/do I have to remove the plants? Should I continue as I've done in the past by pulling them up as soon as they sprout from the ground, or can I wait until their flowers/pods appear (but obviously haven't cracked open yet) and then pick them then?

Any advice you have for me will be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
May 28, 2020 8:54 PM CST
Welcome!

I doubt anyone would plant Jimson Weed. In the area I am from, the farmers walked their fields hand pulling the Jimson Weed and the Star Thistle, both deadly to livestock. You can pull it anytime before it goes to seed.

i can't imagine you have that much. In the worst fields, you could still walk between the adult plants. Maybe a lot of them don't make it to adulthood?
Maybe post a photo so we can make sure you're actually battling Jimson Weed and not something else.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Manitoba, Canada
manitobagardener
May 29, 2020 2:43 PM CST
The lady who owned the garden before us was apparently a little eccentric with her plants (mostly everything we've discovered so far is either toxic or medicinal), so it wouldn't surprise me if she didn't plant it on purpose. They're only seedlings now and from previous years I'm pretty sure it's jimson weed. I've attached an image (hopefully!) of the seedling, but when/if they get the flowers or pods I'll update with a better picture.

DaisyI said: Welcome!

I doubt anyone would plant Jimson Weed. In the area I am from, the farmers walked their fields hand pulling the Jimson Weed and the Star Thistle, both deadly to livestock. You can pull it anytime before it goes to seed.

i can't imagine you have that much. In the worst fields, you could still walk between the adult plants. Maybe a lot of them don't make it to adulthood?
Maybe post a photo so we can make sure you're actually battling Jimson Weed and not something else.



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Name: Sally
central Maryland
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sallyg
May 29, 2020 2:53 PM CST
I've grown garden Datura which is "fancy Jimson weed" Maybe she grew that. I remember baby Datura looking like baby eggplants.
That seedling doesn't seem like Datura to me.

When the farm behind us was getting cleared for development, one season, an entire acre area came up solid Jimson weed. So I do not completely doubt you.


i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
May 29, 2020 3:12 PM CST
That does look like a Jimson Weed seedling. Can you hoe them out?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
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farmerdill
May 29, 2020 3:14 PM CST
Concur. I use Jimson weed as a trap plant for leaf footed bugs. It is easy to control. Hoe or any type of culivator in a cultivated plot. Mowing in a field. It is not a tough weed. The whole plant is toxic (hallucinogenic)but the seeds are the strongest. You have to ingest it tho, Just cultivate or mow before it seeds and it will soon disappear as the seeds have a finite life span. You can also use a broad leaf weed killer if necessary.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
May 30, 2020 9:26 AM CST
I'm with Dillard...
Valuable plant, datura, (jimpson weed).

Doesn't hurt the other plants, attracts pollinators, supposed to help with root knot nematodes...

Scientists and Botanists have experimented grafting tomato to datura in areas like mine where the root knot nematodes are so bad...

And... while you can get "high" eating seeds or making tea, it is not a fun experience and people that try it recreationally seldom bother to repeat the experience.

If it was me... I'd allow the plants to grow to bloom size and then till under as green manure/nematode discouraging solution.

As a kid, I always allowed a plant or two to grow to maturity in my garden... all the extras are easily pulled and left on top of the ground as a mulch!
Southwest U.S. (Zone 7a)
MsDoe
May 30, 2020 10:40 AM CST
Yes, Datura is very toxic to humans and livestock. Lots of plants are, that's how they defend themselves against herbivory.
But... it also has spectacular flowers, and attracts interesting and beneficial insects. So it does sometimes get planted as an ornamental. I'd like to get it started in the native portion of my own yard, but haven't had any luck with it. (It's harsh here!)
Unless you have livestock in the garden area, I hope you'll be able to leave a few plants to enjoy.
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