Seeds forum→Radish seed harvesting

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Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
May 29, 2020 7:06 AM CST
Not sure if this is a trading forum or a how to forum. I have a how to question.

My asian style radishes are bolting. Temp got too hot for too long. Didn't form a bulb at all. I got them into the ground pretty early, forget the number of days to harvest though. So my question is, I'm starting to save seeds. Concerned that the seeds from a plant that didn't perform well might encourage that trait in the plants the seeds produce? Just like using the largest kernel of corns as seed to encourage larger ears of corn. I know it takes many generations to change a plant that drastically. I just don't have a plant that actually grew a bulb to harvest seed.
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Name: Linda
Carmel, IN (Zone 5b)
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mom2goldens
May 30, 2020 7:13 PM CST

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Hi, Thomas: this is a great question (but I don't know the answer). Unfortunately, my radishes never last long enough to go to seed. I hope someone with more knowledge here can answer.

You might also want to try posting this on the vegetable forum--lots of experienced growers there.

https://garden.org/forums/view...

Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
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Leftwood
Jun 2, 2020 2:09 PM CST
The same genetics are still there, whether your radishes performed admirably or not. In the end, you may discover that that particular type of radish just doesn't like your climate. (If you are also growing other radishes that performed well, then perhaps that is the case.) But as you know, genetics don't change overnight, and overall it is unlikely that your particular concern is valid.

The big difference is how you select the best seed. Normally you might be looking for large but non-woody plump radishes, taste, slow bolting, insect resistance, etc. Some of these parameters you aren't able to select for this year, but others, you still can, most notably, slower bolting. The unfortunate thing is that while you select to enhance or keep certain qualities you are able to evaluate, you can't know if you are inadvertently selecting or deselecting for qualities you are not able to evaluate (i.e. radish bulb characteristics).

Additional qualities I would still be looking for is thicker rooted plants, robust plants (yet with lower seed production), larger seeds.
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Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
Jun 2, 2020 3:21 PM CST
Ok. Wasn't really sure if that type of characteristic would be passed through genetics or not. I'll save the seeds if the seed pods form.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
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gardengus
Jun 2, 2020 3:34 PM CST
I just watched a u tube last week and the gardener was eating the seed pods (green)
She said they were good and tasted like radish just not as strong, she also said she used them in stir fry .

Now I wish I did not pull my ''over done'' radish Smiling
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all else is just existing.
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Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
Jun 2, 2020 3:45 PM CST
Hmmmm.... interesting. I would not suggest that she try that with potato berries. I'm going to try to save seed from sweet peas and edamame as well. Edamame should be easy and hopefully the sweet pea will be just letting several of the pods mature longer.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Jun 2, 2020 4:47 PM CST
To be clear, that "type" of genetics (bolting) certainly is passed on (just as it was from your original seed), but it is not enhance unless you (purposely or inadvertently) select for it.

There are radish varieties especially bred for edible seed pod production. I grew some about 20 years ago, and they produced a LOT of pods and seed. Pods were good, but didn't impress me enough to grow them again. The abundance of seeds made good healthy sprouts, though. If I ever wanted to grow my own seed for edible sprouts, radish would be at the top of my list. While some radish types will have pods that get stringy and fibrous quickly, all types of seeds will always be good for sprouting.

Just so you know, Thomas, Sweet peas are not closely related to garden peas. A completely different genus. Don't know if they are edible, so perhaps one ought to check first.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: Thomas Mitchell
Central Ohio (Zone 6a)
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thommesM
Jun 2, 2020 7:38 PM CST
Good call, Rick. I was referring to snow peas.

Interesting that there is a radish that is grown specifically for the pods. I haven't heard of them. It would be interesting to try them.

I just ordered 3 lbs of chick pea seeds. I wanted to try growing chick peas and decided it wasn't too late this season. I could have gotten something silly like 50 seeds for $6.00 or 3 lbs for $12. Hmmm... I don't really need 3lbs but I might try growing sprouts from them. First time growing chick peas so it'll be interesting.
Everyone has something they can teach; everyone has something they can learn.

"America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success. "
— Sigmund Freud

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