Propagation forum→rose propagation (cuttings)

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hampshire
Joneslee
May 29, 2020 7:59 AM CST
I've tried and tried to get a successful rose from a cutting. I have two very old rose which I am desperate to propagate
I cut the new shoots at the join.
I slice away the hard area.
I wet and dip the shoot end in a good organic rooting compound.
I the plant into a small pot with a very good compost (Levingtons M3)
They all fail to root.
Anybody - what should I be doing different from above. e.g should the cuttings be placed outside or in the greenhouse.
Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
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tofitropic
May 29, 2020 8:14 AM CST
I grow rose cutting in tropics, so perhaps it will not much of helps
In my experience, success can be affected by various factors, but one thing I really rely upon is varietal, some rose are just difficult to root, but there are few that is so easy.
so for most roses I prefer grafting, growing easy rooting variety for rootstock, and then grafted with desired rose.
And have you tried rooting hormones,? it really helps with some difficult cuttings.

I cant recommend on times, and temperature, as in my area it's always summer, there for...I have no timing on doing cuttings. Time of the year is also important factor, in temperate area, I wish other will chime in soon.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 29, 2020 11:34 AM CST
I have had a lot of success (I grew a 100 ft hedge from 3 rose bushes Smiling ) by taking the cuttings as I prune, planting them where I wanted them to grow and putting a jar over them for the winter.

The cuttings should be only about 6 inches (and pencil width) with at least 2 (more preferable) leaf nodes. Take the cuttings from the middle of the stems - tip cuttings don't work as well. Plant the cuttings up to just below the top node. When they start to grow leaves, take the jars off.

I have never used rooting hormone and I'm not sure what you mean by "slicing away the hard area." Otherwise, I'm don't see why you couldn't start them in pots but, I would put several cuttings in a 1 gallon pot as, for some reason, cuttings like company. Keep them someplace cool, you want them to grow roots before they leaf out.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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central ohio (Zone 5b)
PlantingOaks
May 29, 2020 12:44 PM CST
DaisyI, I am intrigued.
You say you took the cuttings when you were pruning - was that in the fall, and you put a jar over them immediately? Did you pull off existing leaves both above and below the soil level?

I am guessing that nevada has sandy soil and dry winters?

I have done holly cuttings semi-successfully (as in, several rooted, but grew poorly and did not survive transplanting back outside) but never tried roses. I would like to learn and be able to clone cultivars that I can't find commercially.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 31, 2020 12:45 AM CST
Actually, California central valley. I pruned in mid to late winter when the roses were at their most dormant. You may have to re-eveluate when to take cuttings if the ground freezes. Or put them in pots in the garage.

Roses in warmer climates sometimes need to be helped into dormancy so, no leaves anywhere.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Darrell
Nova Scotia (Zone 4b)
dfeltmate
Aug 15, 2020 6:13 PM CST
Taking cuttings from roses, contrary to many opinions, is about the same as taking cuttings from any shrub. Here in Canadian zone 5, US zone 4, in mid August I would consider this the time for a semi hardwood cutting. Take one about 3/16" to 1/4" thick and having at least three nodes. The bottom cut is just below the first leaf node and only the top 2 leaves are left on the cutting. I remove all thorns as well. Take 3 to six cuttings and prepare a 2 1/2" pot for them. Cuttings like company and I have put nine in one pot. Remember, this is only to get roots, not to grow the plants on. Put a rooting mix in the pot. 50/50 vermiculite or perlite and agricultural grit or builder's sand will work. I like to use pine bark mulch run through a 1/4"grid. >>NO<< fertilizer or plant food of any kind. Cuttings have no roots to use it and it will cause rot. Soak the pot and let it drain. Dip the ends of the cuttings in rooting hormone and stick them 1/2" to 1" deep in the pot. Cover them to keep moisture in. A 2 liter pop bottle with the bottom cut out and the top off will work fine. I put mine in a clear tote but I tend to have far too many cuttings on the go at any one time. Put the pot somewhere it gets light but never direct sunlight, that will cook the cutting. In four to six weeks the cutting will have roots and be ready to be potted on.
Hope this helps. Any questions just ask.
[Last edited by dfeltmate - Aug 16, 2020 10:42 AM (+)]
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