Ask a Question forum→I repotted incorrectly - what can I do to save plant?

Views: 309, Replies: 9 » Jump to the end
Name: Kat
Colorado (Zone 5b)
SnowKat
May 29, 2020 8:44 AM CST
I had a beautiful healthy thriving spider plant. Loved its location, fertilizer and watering. Eventually the rhyzomes were all growing out of the soil and it seemed limp instead of perky even after watering, so I mistakenly thought it needed repotting. I overestimated the size of the pot needed (went from 8 to 12) because I thought the root system was larger than it is, and I didn't seat it correctly in the new pot. Many rhyzomes are above the surface and the stalks seem to be flat. I love my spider plant very much and I don't want to think that I killed it by trying to love it! What options do I have?
Thumb of 2020-05-29/SnowKat/2c3587


Thumb of 2020-05-29/SnowKat/90f346


Thumb of 2020-05-29/SnowKat/191f36


Thumb of 2020-05-29/SnowKat/59b535

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 29, 2020 10:18 AM CST
Did you keep the original rootball intact when you repotted or did you remove some of the original soil?
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Kat
Colorado (Zone 5b)
SnowKat
May 29, 2020 10:23 AM CST
Most of the original rootball is present. It was healthy and happy so I tried to minimize trauma. Worked previously so I followed the same process. I did not soak the plant either. Maybe a mistake since now brown tips on every leaf.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 29, 2020 10:28 AM CST
The wilting does suggest dry soil. It is generally best to water thoroughly after repotting. It may be that the dry soil you added is absorbing the moisture away from the roots. Give it a good soak and see if the leaves perk up some.

That said, be careful not to overwater in the future because the oversized pot will tend to keep the added soil wet/damp longer than before.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Kat
Colorado (Zone 5b)
SnowKat
May 29, 2020 11:22 AM CST
Agreed on the watering in the larger pot. This plant loved a drip waterer, it liked a little bit every other day vs a big water once a week. Probably going to stick to that so that it's easier to monitor the soil.

I am using Miracle Gro Nature's Care organic soil and that's water-conserving as well.

Thanks for your thoughts. I'll try a little extra water this evening (distilled of course) and see if it perks up.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 30, 2020 7:08 AM CST
After repotting, the prior watering routine may no longer be appropriate because there is a lot more added soil. I'm not sure drip irrigation will be appropriate.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
May 30, 2020 7:43 AM CST
Hi SnoKat, Welcome!

Your lovely Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum) may have become droopy and limp due to insufficient water from the use of drip irrigation. Chlorophytum are drought tolerant plants but they need sufficient water during the growing season and I wonder if using a drip system will thoroughly moisten the soil. You should water until it's exiting the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot and then allow the soil to dry somewhat before watering again. Damp soil is fine but if the soil retains too much moisture, the roots will rot. The tuberous roots retain nutrients that supply the plant as needed, so be very careful with fertilizing. It may take a few days for your plant to adjust to it's new, larger container but with proper watering, it should perk up and be just fine.

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
CPPgardener
May 30, 2020 10:45 AM CST
If you don't currently open the blinds much, or at all, you should. Your plant can take a moister soil even in the bigger pot if it gets more light. Lin is right that a good soak when watering is usually better than a little frequently, that way the entire rootball gets wet and not just the top.
“That which is, is.That which happens, happens.” Douglas Adams
Name: Kat
Colorado (Zone 5b)
SnowKat
Jun 3, 2020 10:20 PM CST
My plant has been doing fantastic for five years. I only used a drip waterer for 3 months when I had to work out of state on a consulting contract. It was a customizable one so I can tailor the amount of water using a 6 gallon container full of distilled water. I came back and all my plants were in great shape, all had grown tremendously. My silver pothos is now 12 feet long with gigantic leaves! They love the light, they love their food and they love the water. I have raised many spider plants in the past one of which was about five times the size of this one!

This fella is doing great now. Seems to be adjusting and has already sprouted a new flower stalk. Three others are in full flower. This thing has been constantly in flower for the last 2 years. Spiderettes are quite large, 6 to 8 inch leaves on many. I cut six of them off to grow new plants and take a little burden off of this one.

My house remains in the 60s temperature wise all year round, this window faces east, and the 20% humidity doesn't seem to bother the plants at all. Any other room in the house, only succulents grow and an Aussie tree varietal.

I move the shutters during the day. I only have them cracked until the sun moves overhead and the direct sunlight doesn't hit the plants anymore. At this altitude in Colorado, sunlight can increase UV compared to lower altitudes, and heating effects by 10 to 15 degrees on both human and plant. I've been sunburned in 35 degree weather wearing shorts.

Thumb of 2020-06-04/SnowKat/c98312
Thumb of 2020-06-04/SnowKat/d50afe
Thumb of 2020-06-04/SnowKat/4dfbff

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 4, 2020 9:00 AM CST
I am confused. Are you happy with your plant or concerned about it?
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by lauriemorningglory and is called "Shamrock Leaves of Oxalis"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.