Vegetables and Fruit forum→Young tomato leaves curling up

Views: 1092, Replies: 7 » Jump to the end
Southeast Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
greendream
May 30, 2020 6:34 AM CST
Hello, I have some young tomatoes that have been in the ground for a week.

Even before transplanting the leaves on some of them were cupping or curling up. The lower leaves seem to be yellowing.

Should I replace them with new tomatoes for a fresh start?

Thumb of 2020-05-30/greendream/3e588a




Thumb of 2020-05-30/greendream/5fd492


Thumb of 2020-05-30/greendream/41e162

[Last edited by greendream - May 30, 2020 6:51 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2257025 (1)
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Container Gardener Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Region: Alabama Seed Starter
Image
Intheswamp
May 30, 2020 7:21 AM CST
Welcome to the forum, greendream. Something's going on but I'm not sure what. If you were to replace them with more plants do you think you wouldn't have the same issue? Shrug! Shriveling tomato leaves can be several things. You might want to look at this article: Curled leaves and flowers on tomatoes

What type tomato plants are these? With the lower leaves already yellowing it doesn't sound good.

You might want to add your location in your profile so folks will know where you're located...it can make a difference in the advice that you receive. I'm in hot and humid south Alabama and have a TON of disease issues with tomatoes. Thumbs down While other's here have relatively few problems growing them.
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/

South Alabama Weather
Southeast Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
greendream
May 30, 2020 7:47 AM CST
Hi and thanks! I updated my location.

These are Amish paste tomatoes that I started from seed.

I have other varieties that are curling as well though not as severe. Only in new growth.

Thumb of 2020-05-30/greendream/4fa45b

Name: Paul Fish
Brownville, Nebraska (Zone 5b)
Image
PaulF
May 30, 2020 8:24 AM CST
To me it looks a lot like herbicide drift. If the most affected plants were on the outside of the garden that would be why they showed the most damage. If someone in the area used weed killer, it can carry on the wind a long ways and tender tomatoes can be damaged. They may come out of it. Watering the plants heavily might help. If they continue to go down hill replanting may be the only answer.
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Container Gardener Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Region: Alabama Seed Starter
Image
Intheswamp
May 30, 2020 9:12 AM CST
Even "garden soil" and mulch brought in from elsewhere can bring pesticides with it. Kind of a crap shoot out there if it isn't your own organics or someone you know you can trust.

Paul, I he mentioned that the plants were exhibiting a bit of the curl prior to transplanting...which doesn't necessarily rule out pesticides, but makes me wonder. Possibly during hardening off they may have got some pesticide drift while outside. Dunno.

greendream, did you use bought or saved seeds? What was your germinating medium?
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/

South Alabama Weather

Image
ElPolloDiablo
May 30, 2020 11:04 AM CST
I see you are in Zone 5b.
Those curled leaves are most likely due to nights still being a bit too cold for the tomatoes' liking: older cultivars (Amish Paste was already well known in the 1920's so it qualifies) tend to suffer from leaf curl when stressed by low temperature, which is exactly what i see in your picture. I've had that same problem with many heirlooms I've tried over the years while modt modern tomatoes seem immune.
So what to do now? Absolutely nothing: the damage is merely cosmetic and the plants will keep on growing as normal from now on, nothing to worry about.
The Saviour.
Southeast Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
greendream
May 30, 2020 5:40 PM CST
@intheswamp germinating medium was a blend of peat moss, worm castings and sand. They were later moved to containers in compost when they outgrew their initial accommodations. The compost was Blue Ribbon, delivered from the local garden center. I added a couple inches to my beds with the same compost, which seems to be otherwise doing fine. For example some lettuce that I planted from seeds straight In the beds some weeks back are doing fantastic. The seeds were from bakers creek, used the same pack from last year and they did great.

@ElPolloDiablo I hope you are right! Have had some cool nights in the last week, 44 tonight. When I hardened the seedlings outside some of the days were in the low 50s. So maybe that explains why I observed some curl before planting. No real choice now but to wait and see. Local garden centers are cleared out of tomatoes.

Thank you all for taking a look!

[Last edited by greendream - May 30, 2020 5:46 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2257775 (7)
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Container Gardener Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Region: Alabama Seed Starter
Image
Intheswamp
May 31, 2020 5:58 AM CST
I'm right there with you hoping EPD is correct and things straighten out when it warms up. Thumbs up
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/

South Alabama Weather

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Vegetables and Fruit forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "bleeding heart"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.