Texas Gardening forum→Central TX Tomato/Peppers HELP!

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Name: Oleander H
Belton, TX (Zone 8a)
oleander
May 30, 2020 6:55 PM CST
New raised needs filled with garden mix soil. Transplants all were healthy. Some aren't growing, some dying, some look sick. Same problem last year. What is this? Something in my soil?
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Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Herbs Region: Texas Vegetable Grower Avid Green Pages Reviewer
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pod
May 31, 2020 9:45 AM CST
I'm not as knowledgeable about this but there are some others here that should be able to help.

@gardenfish @Intheswamp Any assistance???
Believe in yourself even when no one else will. ~ Sasquatch
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Seed Starter
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Intheswamp
May 31, 2020 9:07 PM CST
Well, I ain't on expert at figuring disease out, but I've got a bunch of'em down here in south Alabama so I still getting my "continuing education".

It looks like maybe a bacterial of fungal infection in the tomato plant...pretty advanced case, too. I'd say probably the same for the pepper plants. I just today did my first spraying of my tomato plants with some Bonide Copper Fungicide...gardenfish recommended it to me. Two tablespoons (basically 1-oz) of the solution to a gallon of water. Wet the plants well with it. Do not spray when plants are already wet from rain or dew...spray them when they're dry.

I would cut/remove all the dead material from the tomato plant...it all goes in the big green garbage can...don't compost it. Get up the dead leaves, too. Even the yellowing leaves with dead spots could be removed but you need enough foliage left for food production. Like I said, this is a very advanced case. From what I understand (I'm still learning about it) the copper fungicide will slow the disease down, if it is indeed fungal/bacteria...but it's not a cure. It is recommended to start spraying soon after transplanting the tomatoes.

You said you had the same problem last year but you stated (I think you wrote "needs" for "beds", possibly) that this is a new bed with "garden mix soil". Is this the same soil that you planted tomatoes in last year? Disease will overwinter on plant debris, etc.,. It is a good chance that the disease overwintered in the soil and is showing up again this year.

I would get the copper fungicide and spray both the tomatoes and peppers...usually every 10-14 days unless you get a good rain and then it will need re-applying. Don't over-use it, though, as a copper-toxicity can build up in your soil.

This type of disease loves hot and humid conditions. Where are you located? (Hint: Put your location in your user profile...it helps people give advice. Thumbs up

Definitely trim up the dead stuff and dispose of it. Clean the ground debris.

Here is a link to the Bonide Copper Fungicide at Tractor Supply (best price I've seen)... https://www.tractorsupply.com/...

I use the spray in a 1-gallon pump-up sprayer. If you can find a Chapin brand, they seem better than the run-of-the-mill generic ones. The gallon treated eleven tomato plants today and I think I wet them pretty good with it.

Best wishes,
Ed
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/
North Richland Hills, TX (Zone 8a)
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Rido
Jun 2, 2020 10:02 PM CST
I think something in the soil that causing this. I really do not know what exactly it is. Most likely soil pathogens related to fungus that effects the plants root level and up. Heat and humidity is activating and mobilizing the fungus.
I have the same problem last a couple of years. I tried several things. It reduced the impact this year however my peppers leaves look wrinkle but it has not lost leaves and flowers so far this year, that is an improvement from last year and eggplants are looking fantastic. It is definitely working but I think it needs more applications. I am approaching with organic solutions that contains beneficial bacteria that acts like fungicide. I do mix them with water and drench the soil and plants roots with these mixtures.
- Serenade: Contains Bacillus Subtilis
- SouthernAG garden Friendly Fungicide: Contains bacillus amyloliquefaciens.
These are prevention methods that I started doing since March of this year. Once fungus gets into plants system, it is not easy get rid off in one season or one application.
Good luck, let us know if you find better way of getting rid of these plants diseases.
Name: Bea
(Zone 8b)
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bumplbea
Jun 2, 2020 10:10 PM CST


It looks like it could be tomato blight. Caused by fungus. See link to video for ID and treatment.

https://youtu.be/Lf6LrtuqFm8

😉
I’m so busy... “I don’t know if I found a rope or lost a horse.”
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Seed Starter
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Intheswamp
Jun 3, 2020 9:09 AM CST
It looks like a poisonous bush may have been a one-hit wonder.... Hilarious!

@oleander , you still around here?
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/

garden_refuge
Jun 5, 2020 1:00 PM CST
Hello Oleander,
The wrinkling on the peppers could be caused by a cold snap. We had a sudden earlier this spring, if you didn't protect them that's how they protest their stress. It happened to mine last a few years until I figured it out. Feed them liquid seaweed, it should give them a good boost. And be patient peppers have a long season of production. If they don't produce now, they will in the fall if you keep taking care of them.
For the tomatoes, it does not look like blight to me. Blight shows darkness on the stem where the leaf meets the main stem. I think it is spider mites. They do devastate the plant if you do not manage well in the beginning. Give them regular spraying of neem (1tsp)+ 1/2 gal water+ drop of soap. Do it in the evening every other day. Be careful, test on one before you apply it to all plants you might burn them all.
If nothing works, I suggest to take the tomato plants out and discard them. Add compost to the soil, comes July plant new plants. We are lucky here, we get to plant tomatoes twice in one season.
Wish you luck

https://mygardenmyrefuge.com/g...
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Name: Oleander H
Belton, TX (Zone 8a)
oleander
Jun 9, 2020 7:28 PM CST
Intheswamp said:It looks like a poisonous bush may have been a one-hit wonder.... Hilarious!

@oleander , you still around here?


Yeah, I'm here! Busy laughing about my "one hit wonder"! What is that anyway?
Name: Oleander H
Belton, TX (Zone 8a)
oleander
Jun 9, 2020 7:33 PM CST
I'm humbled by the support and responses here! Thank you all! I'm trying to find my way around this new site.

Given what has been said, would solarizing my soil be helpful? Thank You!
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Seed Starter
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Intheswamp
Jun 9, 2020 9:08 PM CST
Somebody smarter'n me's gotta answer the solarization question. It can help kill weed seeds, some pathogens, and some bugs....but not all. It's supposed to improve the tilth of soil. It is supposed to be good if you can do a good job of it.

In looking back at your tomato plant I think you have a viral wilt. I just pulled two Black Cherry tomato plants because of it and it looks much similar. The entire plant will eventually die if it is wilt. How is it doing now? Still alive? The solution if it is indeed a viral wilt is to dispose carefully of the entire plant...get all the plant matter and dispose of it away from the garden. There is no cure for wilt.

Looking again at the peppers....it could(?) be pesticide damage. Or not.

Just so many things that can damage a plant.

You said that you've had this problem for two years in a row and it looks like you're growing in raised beds. I think I'd get a 5-gallon bucket and fill it with some fresh, bagged potting soil and either plant a tomato or a couple of peppers in it. Set the bucket out beside the raised beds. If you can add a line from your irrigation system to the bucket that would be great. That will basically give this new planting the same environment as the raised beds *except* for the actual planting medium. If the plant does good then the soil in the raised bed would be something to consider in regards to being the problem. If the plant doesn't do good then you have either a heavy disease presence at your location, there is something wrong about your watering, or you might be getting drift from a neighbor using some type of herbicide. I'm sure there's other possibilities but those are some I thought about. I would definitely pot up a plant to compare with the bed(s).

Best wishes,
Ed
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/
Name: Oleander H
Belton, TX (Zone 8a)
oleander
Jun 11, 2020 1:26 PM CST


@Intheseamp

I like your ideas!
Name: Oleander H
Belton, TX (Zone 8a)
oleander
Jun 11, 2020 1:29 PM CST
My
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my curcubits are doing great! Jalapeños are thriving! Eggplant and okra coming along like gang busters!

Picture was taken yesterday.
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Birds Beekeeper Bee Lover Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Procrastinator Zinnias Vegetable Grower Seed Starter
Image
Intheswamp
Jun 11, 2020 4:37 PM CST
The thing about a viral infection is that it can pass on to other tomato plants, thus the thought behind getting rid of it. The Black Cherry plants that I pulled were about at the state yours is in. But, rather than letting it continue to shed virus I opted to pull and bag everything I could of it. BUT...I saved the green tomatoes. Black Cherry makes a large cherry type fruit. There were probably a couple of dozen of them, maybe a little more. I set them on a windowsill and every day one or two get ripe. Thumbs up So, it wasn't a total loss....but wasn't what I wanted to happen, either. D'Oh!

You've got a good setup and that irrigation system is a very good thing!!! Hang it there with it, you've got all kinds of goodies to be eating this summer and fall!!!! Thumbs up
The poorest of the poor, a nation of children taking care of children - https://handsofloveusa.org/

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