Houseplants forum→Mildew/Mold on terra-cotta help!

Views: 177, Replies: 4 » Jump to the end
Name: piegirl
Mid
piegirl25
Jun 2, 2020 8:16 AM CST
I've noticed that several of my terra-cotta pots always get a mildew/mold and start to smell after a while. It doesn't seem to directly affect my plants but it's quite annoying. Are they're anyways that I can remove permanently or at least long enough to the point where I won't have to worry who it it for a while? All answers appreciated.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
Image
sallyg
Jun 3, 2020 5:15 AM CST
You could plant you plants in plastic nursery pots and set those inside the terra cotta (can be a pain finding the right fit but you might not be as picky as I am)
And then your terra cotta will stay dry and clean.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 3, 2020 7:16 AM CST
Is the white stuff samp and slimy or is it dry and crusty?

Do you live in a very humid area?

How is your water quality?
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed[email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: piegirl
Mid
piegirl25
Jun 3, 2020 7:46 PM CST
The white stuff is usually powdery and kind of fuzzy. My area gets quite dry, especially towards to summer months but somewhat humid in the spring. The water is hard so water softener is used to help it. Sometimes my pots get lots of calcium deposits too within a couple hours after watering.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 4, 2020 8:37 AM CST
Those are mineral deposits that have seeped through the terra cotta. Excess minerals in the soil can damage tender roots over time. Softened water also contains minerals that are not good for plants. It is better to use filtered or distilled water for your plants.

You can wash or scrape off the mineral deposits on the pots although they are harmless. You might also consider flushing lots of clear water through the soil to remove some of the excess minerals that have already accumulated in the soil.

Letting the soil get too dry will also cause minerals to concentrate more so be sure you are not under-watering.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Houseplants forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "DAYLILY Starling"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.